Memoirs of Celebrated Etonians, Volume 1

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 25 - Deign on the passing world to turn thine eyes, And pause awhile from letters, to be wise; There mark what ills the scholar's life assail, Toil, envy, want, the patron, and the jail.
Page 377 - But hark ! the portals sound, and pacing forth With solemn steps and slow, High potentates, and dames of royal birth, And mitred fathers in long order go : Great Edward, with the lilies on his brow From haughty Gallia torn...
Page 142 - He made an administration so checkered and speckled, he put together a piece of joinery so crossly indented and whimsically dovetailed ; a cabinet so variously inlaid; such a piece of diversified mosaic; such a tessellated pavement without cement; here a bit of black stone and there a bit of white...
Page 198 - you shall be my confessor: when I first set out in the world, I had friends who endeavoured to shake my belief in the Christian religion. I saw difficulties which staggered me; but I kept my mind open to conviction. The evidences and doctrines of Christianity, studied with attention, made me a most firm and persuaded believer of the Christiau religion. I have made it the rule of my life, and it is the ground of my future hopes.
Page 127 - But if he be resolved to assume the right of advising his Majesty, and directing the operations of the war, to what purpose are we called to this council ? When he talks of being responsible to the people, he talks the language of the House of Commons, and forgets, that at this board, he is only responsible to the King.
Page 313 - I think they have done right in giving exemplary damages; to enter a man's house by virtue of a nameless warrant, in order to procure evidence, is worse than the Spanish inquisition; a law under which no Englishman would wish to live an hour...
Page 93 - On this day, the most melancholy sun I had ever beheld arose, and found me awake at my house at Fordhook. By the light of this sun, I was, in my own opinion, last to behold and take leave of some of those creatures on whom I doated with a mother-like fondness, guided by nature and passion, and uncured and unhardened by all the doctrine of that philosophical school where I had learned to bear pains and to despise death.
Page 164 - I rejoice that the grave has not closed upon me ; that I am still alive to lift up my voice against the dismemberment of this ancient and most noble monarchy.
Page 163 - Within his large wig little more was to be seen than his aquiline nose, and his penetrating eye. He looked like a dying man ; yet never was seen a figure of more dignity ; he appeared like a being of a superior species.
Page 89 - Milton, sweetly tuning the heroic lyre, fill my ravished fancy with the hopes of charming ages yet to come. Foretel me, that some tender maid, whose grandmother is yet unborn, hereafter, when, under the fictitious name of Sophia, she reads the real worth which once existed in my Charlotte, shall from her sympathetic breast send forth the heaving sigh.

Bibliographic information