A Book of British and American Verse

Front Cover
Henry Van Dyke, Hardin Craig, Asa Don Dickinson
Doubleday, Page, 1922 - 1908 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

How They Brought the Good
130
Sir Patrick Spens
144
Ye Mariners of England Campbell
150
The Wreck of the Hesperus Longfellow
156
Hervé Riel
162
The Battle of Otterburn
171
Agincourt
176
Bonny Dundee
183
The Battle of the Baltic
189
Song of Marions
199
Monterey
206
Incident of the French Camp Browning
213
The Revenge
222
Fair Helen of Kirconnell
233
We are Seven
252
Proud Maisie
258
The Execution of Montrose Aytoun
270
The Shameful Death
277
The Raven
285
Selections from the Later Poetry
293
The
299
The Forgotten Soul
308
The Ballad of Father Gilligan Yeats
314
Idyls
3
Love Among the Ruins Browning
28
Cowper
31
39
39
48
48
The Sensitive Plant
54
The Eve of St Agnes
68
153
74
The Lake of the Dismal
83
The Building of the Ship Longfellow
89
Darkness
102
Abou Ben Adhem
121
172
172
The Destruction
183
Marco Bozzaris
187
Morte dArthur
204
Ginevra
215
Aux Italiens
224
The Courtin
230
The OneHossShay
236
The Laird oCockpen
251
The Fools Prayer
263
The Statue and the Bust
273
The Private of the Buffs
284
The Patriot
290
Mother and Poet
297
181
vii
3
3
ESON 14
14
Fy 15
15
nfield 16
16
akespeare 18
18
kespeare 19
19
Lovelace
30
Burns
37
To the Skylark
40
Hymn to the Night
46
The Midges Dance Aboon
52
My Star
58
To the Humblebee
64
67
67
The Whaups
70
73
73
A Praise of his Lady Heywood
79
92
89
Come Away Come Away
96
99
99
CherryRipe
103
107
107
The Authors Resolution Wither
110
To Roses in the Bosom
116
3
117
121
121
122
122
The Nightpiece to Julia Herrick
129
Sally in our Alley
142
0 Saw ye Bonnie Lesley? Burns
148
173
173
183
183
O That t Were Possible
185
189
189
A Dead Rose
191
A Farewell to Arms
197
Hail to the Chief who
203
Songs of Lifes Pilgrimage
221
The Worlds Great Age
284
295
295
307
307
Hame Hame Hame
309
319
319
Break Break Break
320
Selections from the Later Poetry
325
CONTENTS
3
Prothalamion
13
196
50
On Time
52
A Supplication
59
Ode to Adversity
70
Allegories and Legends
75
The Progress of Poesy Gray
76
79
84
To a Skylark
124
Ode to a Nightingale Keats
132
Ode to Psyche
139
To a Waterfowl
147
Hood
150
To the Past
161
To the Unknown Eros Patmore
169
Nuns Fret not at Their
175
as Base as is
183
Sonnets
198
199
199
205
205
213
213
Night
215
Sonnet on Chillon
222
Sonnets
232
Longfellow
239
Tennyson
249
The House of Life
257
One Certainty
265
271
271
Sonnets
285
Resurgam
292
Brief Epics and Tales
295
CONTENTS
3
Morris
4
LAllegro
9
kespeare 20
20
A Forest Hymn
34
Freneau
38
The
41
Tintern Abbey
47
Whitman
51
Yarrow Unvisited
53
204
70
Stanzas written in Dejection
73
A Small Sweet Idyl
79
82
82
October
105
The Small Celandine
112
116
116
The Death of the Flowers
118
The Men of
133
140
140
The Sower
144
146
146
Memorabilia
151
Ruth
157
Ulysses
175
Sir Galahad
184
Rabbi Ben Ezra
238
The World
245
Influence of Natural Objects
251
258
258
The Chant of the Colorado Rice
291
295
295
Isaiah Beethoven
308
Lifes Philosophy
317
Dekker
iii
13
vi
Emerson
3
akespeare 21
21
kespeare 22
22
wne 23
23
ammond 24
24
Eton 25
25
ton 26
26
Eton 27
27
tcher 29
29
Felace 302
30
rick 33
33
rrick 34
34
rrick 35
35
rus 36
36
gan 37
37
rdsworth 38
38
Epitaph on the Countess
46
Lycidas
52
On the Death of Thomson Collins
59
61
61
Thoughts
65
The Old Familiar Faces Lamb
73
On the Death of Mr Wil
80
Clough
86
Shelley
90
Rugby Chapel
97
Joseph Rodman Drake Halleck
104
Charles Sumner
111
Rose Aylmer
119
Lament of the Irish
128
She Came and Went
134
The Toys
140
A Child my Choice
149
Love Triumphant
155
The Retreat
161
The Dying Christian to
169
Evening
175
326
237
158
241
317
243
112
251
Interpretation of Nature
253
318
254
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 102 - UNION, strong and great! Humanity with all its fears, With all the hopes of future years, Is hanging breathless on thy fate! We know what Master laid thy keel, What Workmen wrought thy ribs of steel, Who made each mast, and sail, and rope, What anvils rang, what hammers beat, In what a forge and what a heat Were shaped the anchors of thy hope!
Page 192 - s not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks Within his bending sickle's compass come ; Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks, But bears it out even to the edge of doom. If this be error and upon me proved, I never writ, nor no man ever loved.
Page 196 - GOING TO THE WARS Tell me not, Sweet, I am unkind That from the nunnery Of thy chaste breast and quiet mind, To war and arms I fly. True, a new mistress now I chase, The first foe in the field; And with a stronger faith embrace A sword, a horse, a shield. Yet this inconstancy is such As you too shall adore; I could not love thee, dear, so much, Loved I not honour more.
Page 232 - Hear the sledges with the bells, Silver bells! What a world of merriment their melody foretells.' How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle, In the icy air of night! While the stars, that oversprinkle All the heavens, seem to twinkle With a crystalline delight...
Page 94 - I tripp'd lightly as they ; The innocent brightness of a new-born day Is lovely yet ; The clouds that gather round the setting sun Do take a sober colouring from an eye That hath kept watch o'er man's mortality ; Another race hath been, and other palms are won. Thanks to the human heart by which we live, Thanks to its tenderness, its joys, and fears, To me the meanest flower that blows can give Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears.
Page 200 - WHEN I consider how my light is spent, Ere half my days in this dark world and wide, And that one talent which is death to hide Lodged with me useless, though my soul more bent To serve therewith my Maker, and present My true account, lest he, returning, chide, "Doth God exact day-labour, light denied?
Page 291 - Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!" I shrieked, upstarting "Get thee back into the tempest and the Night's Plutonian shore ! Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken ! Leave my loneliness unbroken! quit the bust above my door! Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!
Page 226 - If I should die, think only this of me: That there's some corner of a foreign field That is for ever England. There shall be In that rich earth a richer dust concealed; A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware, Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam, A body of England's, breathing English air, Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home. And think, this heart, all evil shed away, A pulse in the eternal mind, no less Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given; Her sights and...
Page 214 - Comfort thyself: what comfort is in me? I have lived my life, and that which I have done May He within Himself make pure! but thou, If thou shouldst never see my face again, Pray for my soul. More things are wrought by prayer Than this world dreams of. Wherefore, let thy voice Rise like a fountain for me night and day. For what are men better than sheep or goats That nourish a blind life within the brain, If, knowing God, they lift not hands of prayer Both for themselves and those who call them friend?
Page 163 - Week in, week out, from morn till night, You can hear his bellows blow : You can hear him swing his heavy sledge, With measured beat and slow, Like a sexton ringing the village bell When the evening sun is low. And children coming home from school, Look in at the open door ; They love to see the flaming forge, And hear the bellows roar, And catch the burning sparks that fly Like chaff from a threshing-floor.

Bibliographic information