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DEMONSTRATION OF SCHOOL WORK.

FOOD FAIRIES.

Miss CONWELL. I am going to try to demonstrate to you one of the health lessons that we give throughout the schools in our district as well as in the Philadelphia district and, I think, by a couple of other councils. The lesson is the type of lesson that we want to give to everybody; not only to children. As Mr. Balderston said before this morning, I hope that every man and woman here will imagine that he is back-well, 10 or 20 or 30 years, or how many years you have to go back [laughter] to be a child again, so that you might get the lesson, perhaps, just a little bit clearer or just a little bit differently from what the man or woman would.

I will probably talk to the children more than I will to the men and women, but I hope you will forgive me for that because I want

1 reaction; if you have any reaction to give, I will be glad to have it from you, too. [Applause.]

I want you boys and girls to answer me, if you have an answer to make, when I talk with you because I want to tell you a story.

Good morning, boys and girls.
CHILDREN. Good morning.

Miss Conwell. I am glad to see you here and I am awfully glad to tell you about the little friends that I have brought with me this morning. You all know about fairies, don't you?

CHILDREN. Yes.

Miss CONWELL. You all know that fairies are pretty nice to you, don't you?

CHILDREN. Yes.

Miss CONWELL. Well, I want you to know that every little boy and girl has a little house of his own that he has to help to make grow, and these little fairies that I have with me this morning are going to tell you how you might make this house that you have grow just a little bit better, a little bit stronger, a little bit bigger, perhaps, if you do what the little fairies say.

These little faries are fine fairies. We have all kinds. We have the kind with wands that change the different things into other things. We have the Christmas fairy—and you know that fairy, don't you? We have the Easter fairy. You all like them, don't vou? But the fairies that I have with me this morning are good fairies, the kind of fairies that make this house (indicating the body) that we live in grow a little bit stronger.

The first little fairy I have is this little fellow. You see he is pretty strong looking, don't you? I asked him what his name was and he told me that his name was Peter Protein. I said, “ Well, what do you do for boys and girls?” He said, “Oh, I make boys and girls strong. I give them something in their arms so they can play.”

What do you get in your arms?
CHILD. Muscle.

Miss CONWELL. He said, “I give boys and girls muscle so they can be strong." Then I said, “Well, where do you live that they inight get this muscle?" He said, “ I have a pretty good home in

meat.” I said to him, “ Well, I will put you in meat for a little while, but I think we can find a better home for you than that."

So I brought this little meat house for him to live in. It is really truly meat. I want you to see what is on the outside of this meat. What is on the outside of this meat? What is it?

CHILDREN. Fat.

Miss CONWELL. So we will put little Peter Protein in his meat house for a little while, but I think we can find a better home for him later on.

Then the next little fairy that came was this little fairy. I asked her what her name was and she said, “My name is Fannie Fat." I said, “ Well, what do you do for boys and girls?” She said, “ Oh, I make boys and girls nice and fat; I make them nice and chubby and give them nice big fat cheeks and I keep them warm, too." I said, "Well, where do you live?"

Where do you suppose she told me she lived? Anybody know? CHILD. In butter.

Miss CONWELL. Yes; in butter. There it is. So we are going to put the butter house down there for her to live in. Then she told me she lived in another house. Fat-she said she lived in fat of the meat. I am going to put Fannie Fat down here with the fat of the meat for a little while. I wonder how many boys and girls, when mother gives them a piece of meat with fat on it, cut the fat off and push it over to one side? How many do that?

(All the children indicated that they did.) Miss CONWELL. We are not going to do that any more because Fannie Fat helps us to get fat and she keeps us warm. We are going to let Fannie Fat stay there for a little while, but I think we can find a better home for her, too.

a Then this little fairy came along. I said to her, “Well, what is

, your name?” She said, “My name is Minnie Mineral Matter.” I said, “ What can you do for boys and girls?” She said, “ Oh, I make boys and girls' bones grow. I make them nice and tall and hard so that they can stand up nice and straight.” I said, “ Well, where do you live?” She said, “ I live in all of the vegetables.”

So I brought some vegetables for Minnie Mineral Matter to live in and I am sure you are going to tell me what these vegetables are. I am sure you know what this is.

CHILD. Lettuce. Miss CONWELL. Minnie says that she lives in that for boys and girls and I am sure you know what this is.

Child. Spinach.

Miss CONWELL. Yes. She said she lives in spinach, too. I am sure you know what this is. It is carrots. I also call carrots the " little miners” because they dig way down into the earth and get all the minerals that help to build this house of ours. There is iron—and you know you need iron to keep your blood in good condition. You could not take a piece of iron and chew it and get the benefit of it.

Then we need some lime to help to build our bones and make them hard and to make our teeth nice and hard. You could not eat a piece of lime and get it in here, could you? So we have to ask all these little fairies in the vegetables to help us out and then I am sure you know what these are?

CHILD. String beans.

Miss CONWELL. Yes. You all like string beans and peas and all those other things. There are the potatoes and the carrots and the beets and the onions and the parsnips and the lettuce and the spinach and the kale and all those other things that mother gives you at times. This little fairy says she 1 ves in all these things and she builds the foundation of our bod es so we can stand up nice and straight and have a good posture.

So we will put the little house down here for Minnie to live in for a little while.

Then this little fairy came along. I asked her what her name was, and she said, “My name is Susie Sugar." I said, “Well, what do you do for boys and girls?” She said, “I give boys and girls energy so they can go and run and play and do all the things that boys and girls want to do." I said, “Well, where do you live!" She said, I have lots of homes, but my best home for boys and girls is in fruits."

So we have brought a fruit house for her to live in.

Then she said she lived in cereals, too. We have all kinds of cereals, breakfast cereals and things like that, and then we have another kind of cereal that perhaps some of us don't know so much about, and that is the cereal bread. Do you know what kind of bread that is?

CHILD. Rye bread.
Miss CONWELL. No; not rye bread.

This is whole-wheat bread. I wish that mother would buy wholewheat bread for you. If you don't have it, ask mother to buy it for you. Susie Sugar and Fannie Fat and Peter Protein live in here, so it must be pretty good, don't you think?

Now, Susie Sugar says that she has another home, but before I tell you about this other home I must tell you something about the home, because this kind of a home is only good for boys and girls at times. It is the kind of a home that lots of boys and girls like, too, but I am afraid they don't get it at the right time.

I am sure you know what this is. Do you know what this is?

CHILD. Cheese.
(Candy was wrapped in tinfoil.)

Miss CONWELL. No; chocolate. It is the candy home. Susie Sugar is always shy when she tells us of the candy home, because she knows that boys and girls get a candy home too often and not always at the right time. The best time for the candy home is after supper, after dinner, for dessert. That is the right time for candy home. So we will put the little candy home down here, too, for Susie to live in for a little while.

Then I had another little fairy come with me and it was this little fairy. I said to her, “What is your name? You look so nice!” She said, "I am Viola Vitamin." I said, “Well, what do you do for boys and girls?” She said, “Oh, I give them life and health and strength and everything that boys and girls need to make them big and strong and happy. I said, “Well, where do you live!" She said, “Well, I live in all the houses that boys and girls ought to have. I live in the vegetables; I live in the fruits; I live in the cereals.”

So I didn't bring any home for Viola to live in. I am going to let her visit all around because I always call her the Queen of the Fairies. She just has a home with all the food fairies, so we will put her down here with the rest of the fairies for a little while.

After I was through talking with all these little fairies and they told me all about their houses, Peter Protein said to me, "I don't live in meat for boys and girls, I only live in meat for mothers and fathers." I said, “Well, where do you live for boys and girls ? ": And where do you suppose he told me he lived?

CHILD. In milk.

Miss Conwell. Milk; yes. I was so glad that he told me he lived in milk that I brought a milk house for him to live in. I am going to take Peter Protein away from the meat house and I am going to put him in the milk house, because he says if boys and girls drink milk every day they will get the muscle and the strength that they need to make them strong, so they can play and do the things that boys and girls want to do.

Then little Fanny Fat said, “I don't live in meat, either, for boys and girls; I only live in meat for fathers and mothers." What part of the milk do you think she lives in? CHILD. Cream.

Miss CONWELL. Yes; she lives up here in the cream. She is all dressed up for it, isn't she?

We are going to put Fannie Fat up in the cream of the milk because that is where she wants to live.

When we are getting a drink of milk at home, let's ask mother to shake up the bottle so we can get a drink of all of it, because we need all of the milk to make us grow.

Then little Minnie Mineral Matter said, “I live in that milk house, too." I said, “ But what shall I do with your vegetable house?” She said, “Oh, don't put the vegetables away, because boys and girls need vegetables every day. It makes them healthy and strong. It makes their bones grow and their teeth grow. It regulates their bodies, and every vegetable that mother cooks boys and girls must learn to eat."

The little Susie Sugar said, “I live in that milk house, too." I said, “What shall I do with your houses? You have several to look after.” She said, “ Oh, don't put the cereal house away because boys and girls should have cereal every day. And don't put the fruit house away because boys and girls must have fruit every day; but take that candy house and take the meat house and put those houses away because boys and girls don't need candy every day; just once in a while, and then they will be lots better if they depend on what they get in the vegetables and the fruits and the milk."

And then Viola Vitamin said, “I live in that milk bottle, too." And I am going to put her up here besides Fannie Fat because, she says, it is the cream in milk that makes boys and girls grow and look the way they want to look.

Now we have all of these little food fairies in their other home. They have homes here, too, but they all live in the milk house. I wonder where you can find them all the time when you want them all together?

CHILD. In the milk.
Miss CONWELL. Yes, in the milk.

Each one of these little fairies in the milk and all these other things help to make this house grow. This little fairy makes the foundation of the house, makes our bones grow so we can stand up straight. We would look awfully funny without bones, would't we? We couldn't grow at all without bones. Then this little fairy comes and covers our bones with this nice flesh and keeps our house warm. And this little fairy comes and gives us the muscle we need so we can be good and strong, and that little fairy comes to give us energy so we can run and walk and play and do the things that boys and girls want to do.

This little fairy comes and makes us bright and happy and gives us nice rosy cheeks, gives us nice shiny hair, and all the other things we need to make us look nice.

Now we have all the fairies in one home. Where is the best home for the fairies?

CHILDREN. In the milk.

Miss CONWELL. And where is the best place for the boys and girls to get the fairies?

CHILDREN. In the milk.
Miss CONWELL. In the milk bottle.

Now I would like for you to tell mother about all these fairies. I would like to have you tell her about each one of these fairies and tell her just what they do for this little house that each boy and girl must help to make grow, and then I am sure if we do all the things the little fairies tell us and drink the milk, which is the home of all the good fairies, we are going to grow to be the best boys and girls that we can be. [Applause.]

(A chalk talk on “The relation of diet to sound teeth” and a play, “ Milk Fairies,” were then given.)

(Adjournment.)
(Papers read by title) :

QUALITY CONTROL WORK OF THE DAIRY COUNCIL.

Curtis I. COHEE, Jr., Philadelphia Interstate Dairy Council, Philadelphia, Pa.

Because of the importance of milk in the human diet, and because the safety of the milk supply bears such a close relation to public health, the dairy industry has important responsibilities for the quality of the product which it produces and distributes. For this reason, the Philadelphia Interstate Dairy Council soon organized a quality control department to cooperate with all other agencies in improving the supply of the territory in which it is operating, and other local councils have been closely following this example.

Two methods may be used to secure a safe supply of milk of good quality. One method is through the enforcement of regulatory leg, islation. Undoubtedly such legislation has, in many cases, resulted

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