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Then may follow these Selections from I Cor. xv. Now is Christ risen from the dead, and become the first fruits of them that slept. For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive.

There is one glory of the sun, and another glory of the moon, and another glory of the stars ; for one star differeth from another star in glory. So also is the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption, it is raised in incorruption ; it is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory; it is sown in weakness, it is raised in power; it is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body.

Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; neither doth corruption inherit incorruption. For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality. So when this corruptible shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall have put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory. O Death, where is thy sting? () grave, where is thy victory? Thanks be to God, who giveth us the victory, through our Lord Jesus Christ.

Then the minister, either at the grave, or in the place where

the people are assembled, may say: I HEARD a voice from heaven, saying unto me, Write, From henceforth blessed are the dead who die in the Lord ; even so, saith the Spirit; for they rest from their labors.

They shall hunger no more, neither thirst any more ; for the Lamb, which is in the midst of the throne, shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters ; and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.

There shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, nor pain : for the former things shall have passed away.

'If our earthly house of this tabernacle be dissolved, we have a building of God, a house not made with hands, eternal in the heavens. We are willing, therefore, to be absent from the body, that we may be present with the Lord.

And now may the blessing of God our Father, who, according to his abundant mercy, hath begotten us again unto a lively hope by the resurrection of his Son; and the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has brought life and immortality to light through his gospel ; be with us all, to give us comfort and peace, for evermore. AMEN.

Note. It is intended that the clergyman shall read such parts of this service as he may deem expedient; and introduce such remarks, prayen, or hymns, as may be considered appropriate to the occasion.

COLLECTION

OF

PSALMS AND HYMNS

FOR

CHRISTIAN WORSHIP.

I will sing of mercy and judgment; unto thee, O Lord, will I sing.

Psalm ci. 1.

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Entered according to act of Congress, in the year 1835, by

CARTER, HENDE E & CO., In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Massachusetts.

STEREOTYPED BY
GEORGE A. CURTIS;
NEW ENGLAND TYPE AND STEREOTYPE FOUNDRY.

PREFACE

As some account may be expected, of the principles on which this collection of hymns was made, it will be here given in a few words.

My main object has been, to gather from the existing body of divine poetry, those hymns which I deemed the best calculated to be sung in our churches. I consequently adopted all which appeared to me to possess the requisite poetical and devotional character, without regard to the particular denomination of Christians to which their authors belonged. Hymns from Wesley's collection, and some .Moravian hymns from the Christian Psalmist of Montgomery, I regard as among the richest contents of this volume. Their delightful fervor, though by some it may be called methodistical, will be thought by others, I trust, to be the true spirit of devotional Christian poetry.

I have taken care to alter as little as possible from my originals, and to obtain all hymns, whenever it was practicable, as their authors wrote and published them. The effusions of Waits and Doddridge, the two principal classics in this high and difficult species of literature, will be found in a purer form in this volume than they are usually met with in other collections. Whenever a hymn by one of these, or any other author, seemed to require a great deal of alteration, it was not altered, but left; for it was my desire and intention that every hymn, as it appeared in this collection, should be really the production of the individual whose name is placed over it. I freely omitted such verses, however, as I did not approve, whenever it could be done without essential injury to the connexion.

Those words and expressions which I consider as forming the peculiar and appropriate diction and imagery of sacred poetry, such as Zion, Israel, Canaan, Saints, &c., I have constantly retained.

The adaptation of musical emphasis and expression to the words, I have left with intelligent and well instructed choirs.

Although I undertook this work, because I was not altogether satisfied with any collection which I had seen, yet I cannot hope to have succeeded to the entire satisfaction of others.

I am conscious

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