The National Fourth Reader: Containing a Course of Instruction in Elocution, Exercises in Reading and Declamation, and Copious Notes : Giving the Pronunciation and Definitions of Words, Biographical Sketches of Persons Whose Names Occur in the Reading Lessons, and the Explanation of Classical and Historical Allusions

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A.S. Barnes & Burr, 1859 - 408 pages
 

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Page 350 - I saw a smith stand with his hammer, thus, The whilst his iron did on the anvil cool, With open mouth swallowing a tailor's news ; Who, with his shears and measure in his hand, Standing on slippers, (which his nimble haste Had falsely thrust upon contrary feet) Told of a many thousand warlike French, That were embattailed and rank'd in Kent.
Page 26 - Who is here so base that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude that would not be a Roman?
Page 282 - If I am right, Thy grace impart, Still in the right to stay ; If I am wrong, oh, teach my heart To find that better way.
Page 342 - The secret which the murderer possesses soon comes to possess him, and like the evil spirits of which we read, it overcomes him and leads him whithersoever it will. He feels it beating at his heart, rising to his throat, and demanding di.sclosure. He thinks the whole world sees it in his face, reads it in his eyes, and almost hears its workings in the very silence of his thoughts.
Page 390 - That skins the vice o' the top. Go to your bosom ; Knock there, and ask your heart what it doth know That 's like my brother's fault : if it confess A natural guiltiness such as is his, Let it not sound a thought upon your tongue Against my brother's life.
Page 26 - O, now you weep, and I perceive you feel The dint of pity; these are gracious drops. Kind souls, what! weep you when you but behold Our Caesar's vesture wounded ? Look you here, Here is himself, marr'd as you see, with traitors.
Page 376 - If thou art a child, and hast ever added a sorrow to the soul, or a furrow to the silvered brow of an affectionate parent if thou art a husband, and hast ever caused the fond bosom that ventured its whole happiness in thy arms, to doubt one moment of thy kindness or thy truth...
Page 26 - Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue : but if you mouth it, as many of our players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines.
Page 36 - I hate him for he is a Christian; But more for that in low simplicity He lends out money gratis, and brings down The rate of usance here with us in Venice. If I can catch him once upon the hip, I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
Page 31 - A wise son maketh a glad father: but a foolish son is the heaviness of his mother.

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