1. Statement of facts presented [by sir J.C. Hippisley] to the sovereign pontiff p. Pius vii., 1818 [in reference to the Catholics of England and Ireland]. ii. A letter [from sir J.C. Hippisley] to cardinal Litta ... 1818 [in respect of the re-establishment of the Jesuits in England].

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Page 79 - More especially, we pray for the good estate of the Catholic Church; that it may be so guided and governed by Thy good Spirit, that all who profess and call themselves Christians may be led into the way of truth, and hold the faith in unity of spirit, in the bond of peace, and in righteousness of life.
Page 31 - God, to justify his law, shall suddenly cut off this society, even by the hands of those who have most succoured them, and made use of them ; so that, at the end, they shall become odious to all nations. They shall be worse than Jews, having no resting-place upon earth, and then shall a Jew have more favour than a Jesuit.
Page 31 - These shall spread over the whole world, shall be admitted into the councils of princes, and they never the wiser ; charming of them, yea, making your princes reveal their hearts and the secrets therein...
Page 31 - God, by neglect of fulfilling of the law of God, and by winking at their sins ; yet in the end, God, to justify his law, shall suddenly cut off...
Page 118 - Charge which is now submitted to the world. I excused myself from complying with their request, because I considered the Catholic Question to have been then settled, at least for a time ; and I was unwilling to revive the discussion of a subject, on which I had the misfortune to differ in Opinion from a Majority in each House of Parliament. — I have still that misfortune— but looking upon the situation of the Empire to be abundantly more hazardous now than it was three years ago, I...
Page 61 - Commons for fear of its being ' sifted,' " immediately after the Easter Recess, to the end of the third " reading, and the consequent debate upon it. This Bill was " contrived with a heart and malice which none but the spirits " of wickedness in high places — mentioned by St. Paul, could " have suggested, to undermine and wither the fair Trees " of the English and Irish Catholic Churches...
Page 97 - First, the Catholic Prelates of Ireland are willing to give a direct negative power to his Majesty's Government, with respect to the nomination of their titular bishoprics, in such manner that, when they have among themselves resolved who is the fittest person for the vacant see, they will transmit his name to his Majesty's Ministers, and, if the latter should object to that name, they will transmit another and another, until a name is presented to which no objection is made; and (which is never...
Page 59 - ... ridiculous, and despicable, not only in England, but in every kingdom of Europe ; it probably would not then be amiss to review and soften these rigorous edicts ; at least till the civil principles of the Roman catholics called again upon the legislature to renew them : for it ought not to be left in the breast of every merciless bigot, to drag down the vengeance of these occasional laws upon inoffensive, though mistaken subjects ; in opposition to the lenient inclinations of the civil magistrate,...
Page 32 - Church ; and further, concerning the use and explication of certain maxims, which the Holy See has, with reason, proscribed as scandalous, and manifestly contrary to good morals ; and, lastly, concerning other matters of great importance and prime necessity towards preserving the integrity and purity of the doctrines of the gospel, from which maxims have resulted very great inconveniencies and great detriment, both in our days and in past ages ; such as the revolts and intestine troubles in some...
Page 98 - That, in the appointment of the prelates of the Roman Catholic religion to vacant sees within the kingdom, such interference of government as may enable it to be satisfied of the loyalty of the person appointed, is just, and ought to be agreed to.

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