Shakespeare's History of King Henry the Fifth

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Harper & brothers, 1897 - 191 pages

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Page 50 - A' made a finer end and went away an it had been any christom* child; a' parted even just between twelve and one, even at the turning o' the tide: for after I saw him fumble with the sheets and play with flowers and smile upon his fingers...
Page 155 - O, how this spring of love resembleth The uncertain glory of an April day ; Which now shows all the beauty of the sun, And by and by a cloud takes all away ! Re-enter PANTHINO.
Page 24 - On this unworthy scaffold to bring forth So great an object. Can this cockpit hold The vasty fields of France ? Or may we cram Within this wooden O the very casques That did affright the air at Agincourt...
Page 59 - Be copy now to men of grosser blood, And teach them how to war ! — And you, good yeomen, "Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture...
Page 60 - ... grosser blood, And teach them how to war. And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture ; let us swear That you are worth your breeding ; which I doubt not ; For there is none of you so mean and base That hath not noble lustre in your eyes. I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips, Straining upon the start. The game 's afoot : Follow your spirit ; and upon this charge Cry ' God for Harry ! England and Saint George !
Page 34 - Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their emperor; Who, busied in his majesty, surveys The singing masons building roofs of gold, The civil citizens kneading up the honey, The poor mechanic porters crowding in Their heavy burdens at his narrow gate, The sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum, Delivering o'er to executors pale The lazy yawning drone.
Page 94 - God's will! I pray thee, wish not one man more. By Jove, I am not covetous for gold, Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost; It yearns me not if men my garments wear; Such outward things dwell not in my desires; But if it be a sin to covet honour, I am the most offending soul alive.
Page 33 - Where some, like magistrates, correct at home, Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad; Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds; Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their emperor...
Page 95 - And rouse him at the name of Crispian. He, that shall live this day, and see old age, Will yearly on the vigil feast his friends, And say— to-morrow is saint Crispian : Then will he strip his sleeve, and show his scars, And say, these wounds I had on Crispin's day.
Page 95 - This story shall the good man teach his son; And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remembered, — We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he today that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother...

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