The Works of Adam Smith: Considerations concerning the formation of languages. Essays on philosophical subjects. Account of the life and writings of Dr. Smith

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T. Cadell, 1811
 

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Page 72 - Philosophy, by representing the invisible chains which bind together all these disjointed objects, endeavours to introduce order into this chaos of jarring and discordant appearances, to allay this tumult of the imagination...
Page 486 - The violence and injustice of the rulers of mankind is an ancient evil, for which, I am afraid, the nature of human affairs can scarce admit of a remedy. But the mean rapacity, the monopolizing spirit of merchants and manufacturers, who neither are, nor ought to be, the rulers of mankind, though it cannot perhaps be corrected, may very easily be prevented from disturbing the tranquillity of any body but themselves.
Page 452 - Buccleugh under the author's care, and would make it worth his while to accept of that charge. As soon as I heard this, I called on him twice, with a view of talking with him about the matter, and of convincing him of the propriety of sending that young nobleman to...
Page 372 - He knew not the shape of any thing, nor any one thing from another, however different in shape, or magnitude, but upon being told what things were, whose form he before knew from feeling, he would carefully observe, that he might know them again; but having too many objects to learn at once, he forgot many of them : and (as he said) at first he learned to know, and again forgot a thousand things in a day.
Page 486 - Commerce, which ought naturally to be, among nations as among individuals, a bond of union and friendship, has become the most fertile source of discord and animosity.
Page 469 - Euge! Belle! Dear Mr. Smith : I am much pleased with your performance, and the perusal of it has taken me from a state of great anxiety. It was a work of so much expectation, by yourself, by your friends, and by the public, that I trembled for its appearance ; but am now much relieved.
Page 513 - ... of his mind. In this amiable quality, he often recalled to his friends, the accounts that are given of good La Fontaine ; a quality which in him derived a peculiar grace from the singularity of its combination with those powers of reason and of eloquence which, in his political and moral writings, have long engaged the admiration of Europe.
Page 451 - You see what a son of the earth that is, to value books only by the profit they bring him. In that view, I believe it may prove a very...

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