The Poems of Richard Corbet, Late Bishop of Oxford and of Norwich

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1807 - 260 pages
 

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Page 215 - Witness those rings and roundelays Of theirs, which yet remain, Were footed in Queen Mary's days On many a grassy plain; But since of late, Elizabeth And, later, James came in, They never danced on any heath As when the time hath been.
Page 152 - Thy worth, thy life, but he that hath lived so. He must have wit to spare and to hurl down, Enough to keep the gallants of the town, He must have learning plenty, both the Laws, Civil and Common, to judge any cause, Divinity great store, above the rest...
Page 248 - He would pronounce the word Damn with such an emphasis as left a doleful echo in his auditors
Page lvi - Dr. Lushington, was a very learned and ingenious man, and they loved one another. The Bishop would sometimes take the key of the wine-cellar, and he and his chaplaine would...
Page 214 - Or Ciss to milking rose, Then merrily went their tabor, And nimbly went their toes. Witness those rings and roundelays Of theirs which yet remain, Were footed in Queen Mary's days On many a grassy plain. But since...
Page 213 - Meadow Brow, by the learned; by the unlearned, to the tune of Fortune." " Farewell, rewards and fairies, Good housewives now may say, For now foul sluts in dairies Do fare as well as they ; And though they...
Page 151 - ... either may undo thee. I wish thee learning not for show, Enough for to instruct, and know ; Not such as gentlemen require To prate at table, or at fire. I wish thee all thy mother's graces, Thy father's fortunes, and his places. I wish thee friends, and one at court, Not to build on, but support; To keep thee, not in doing many Oppressions, but from suffering any. I wish thee peace in all thy ways, Nor lazy nor contentious days ; And when thy soul and body part, As innocent as now thou art.
Page 144 - Whose least perfection was large, and great Enough to make a common man compleat. A soul refin'd and cull'd from many men, That reconcil'd the sword unto the pen, Using both well. No proud forgetting Lord, But mindful of mean names and of his word.
Page 216 - An hundred of their merry pranks, By one that I could name, Are kept in store ; con twenty thanks To William for the same. To William...
Page 248 - And all the high commission ; I gave him no grace, But told him to his face, That he favour'd superstition. Boldly I preach, hate a cross, hate a surplice, Mitres, copes, and rochets : Come hear me pray nine times a day, And fill your heads with crotchets.

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