The Church of England in Industrialising Society: The Lancashire Parish of Whalley in the Eighteenth Century

Front Cover
Boydell Press, 2003 - 228 pages
Was the Church of England an ailing or a healthy institution in the eighteenth century? Responding to the slings and arrows of its Victorian critics, ever since the publication in the 1930s of Norman Sykes' Church and State in England in the Eighteenth Century, modern scholarship has tended to stress the competence of the Church's leadership at a national and diocesan level and its importance and popularity for the nation at large. Moreover, in recent years, several studies have emerged which argue a strong case for the multi-faceted appeal of the Church of England at the local level. However, although this revisionist scholarship helps to underline the importance of religion for eighteenth-century English society, it fails to account for the haemorrhaging of support which the Church of England experienced in the first half of the nineteenth century. With reference to the situation in England's largest parish, this new study of the Church of England's fortunes in the eighteenth century demonstrates its long-term failure to retain the loyalty and affections of many men and women in the country's industrialising areas. In drawing attention to hitherto neglected issues such as the situation of the Church of England's non-graduate clergy and the failure of its ecclesiastical courts, it presents a post-revisionist case which challenges the existing academic consensus on the situation and success of this faltering institution.

Dr M.F. SNAPE teaches in the Department of Theology at the University of Birmingham long-term failure to retain the loyalty and affections of many men and women in the country's industrialising areas. In drawing attention to hitherto neglected issues such as the situation of the Church of England's non-graduate clergy and the failure of its ecclesiastical courts, it presents a post-revisionist case which challenges the existing academic consensus on the situation and success of this faltering institution.

Dr M.F. SNAPE teaches in the Department of Theology at the University of Birmingham long-term failure to retain the loyalty and affections of many men and women in the country's industrialising areas. In drawing attention to hitherto neglected issues such as the situation of the Church of England's non-graduate clergy and the failure of its ecclesiastical courts, it presents a post-revisionist case which challenges the existing academic consensus on the situation and success of this faltering institution.

Dr M.F. SNAPE teaches in the Department of Theology at the University of Birmingham long-term failure to retain the loyalty and affections of many men and women in the country's industrialising areas. In drawing attention to hitherto neglected issues such as the situation of the Church of England's non-graduate clergy and the failure of its ecclesiastical courts, it presents a post-revisionist case which challenges the existing academic consensus on the situation and success of this faltering institution.

Dr M.F. SNAPE teaches in the Department of Theology at the University of Birmingham ity of Birmingham
 

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Contents

The Church and Popular Anglicanism
15
The Church and Folk Christianity
42
Philanthropy Education and the Church
72
The Church its Courts and the Regulation of Morality
97
Incomes Pluralism and Patronage
133
Careers and Ministries
163
Conclusion
193
Index
217
Copyright

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