The Howard Review, Volumes 1-2

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Dudley Weldon Woodard
Howard University, 1923
 

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Page 268 - Grief fills the room up of my absent child, Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me ; Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words, Remembers me of all his gracious parts, Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form ; Then, have I reason to be fond of grief.
Page 250 - Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear; And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crown'd withal.
Page 89 - At the usual evening hour the chapel bell began to toll, and Thomas Newcome's hands outside the bed feebly beat time. And just as the last bell struck, a peculiar sweet smile shone over his face, and he lifted up his head a little, and quickly said, " Adsum !
Page 250 - Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty...
Page 79 - She was dead. No sleep so beautiful and calm, so free from trace of pain, so fair to look upon. She seemed a creature fresh from the hand of God, and waiting for the breath of life not one who had lived and suffered death.
Page 250 - Glamis thou art, and Cawdor, and shalt be What thou art promised : yet do I fear thy nature; \ It is too full o' the milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way : thou wouldst be great ; Art not without ambition, but without The illness should attend it : what thou wouldst highly, 20 That wouldst thou holily ; wouldst not play false, And yet wouldst wrongly win: thou'ldst have, great Glamis, That which cries " Thus thou must do, if thou have it; And that which rather thou dost fear to do Than...
Page 186 - Common sense says, we lose our fortune, are sorry and weep; we meet a bear, are frightened and run; we are insulted by a rival, are angry and strike. The hypothesis here to be defended says that this order of sequence is incorrect...
Page 252 - And wakes it now, to look so green and pale At what it did so freely? From this time Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard To be the same in thine own act and valour As thou art in desire? Wouldst thou have that Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life, And live a coward in thine own esteem, Letting "I dare not" wait upon "I would," Like the poor cat i
Page 156 - Manes. Agricolae prisci, fortes, parvoque beati, Condita post frumenta, levantes tempore festo Corpus et ipsum animum spe finis dura ferentem, Cum sociis operum, pueris, et conjuge fida, Tellurem porco, Silvanum lacte piabant, Floribus et vino Genium, memorem brevis aevi. Fescennina per hune inventa licentia morem Versibus alternis opprobria rustica fudit...
Page 186 - My theory, on the contrary, is that the bodily changes follow directly the perception of the exciting fact, and that our feeling of the same changes as they occur is the emotion.

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