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PRINTED BY D. WILLISON, CRAIG'S CLOSE,
FOR ARCH. CONSTABLE & co. EDINBURGH,
AND T. N. LONGMAN & O. REES,

LONDON

1804,

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ADVERTISEMENT.

THE Editors have annexed to this Number, a List of all the Books that have been published in this country during the last three months, and of the most considerable works that have yet reached them from the Continent. The List, as it stands, is unquestionably the most complete that has yet been presented to the Public ; and the Editors have it in contemplation to enlarge it, in some of the succeeding Numbers, by the addition of very brief characters of such of the new works as have been perused, and are not thought to require a more extensive discussion.

24. October 1803.

EDINBURGH REVIEW,

OCTOBER 1803.

No. v.

Art. I. Ledxres on the Elements of Chemistry, delivered in the Unie

versity of Edinburgh, by the late Jofeph Black, M. D. &c. &c. &c. Now publisbed from his MSS. by John Robifon, LL.D. Professor of Natural Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh, 2 vol. 4to. pp. 1384. Longman & Rees, London. Creech, Edinburgh. 1803.

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In performing the duties of Editor to the discourses of his de. 1 parted friend, Profeffor Robison had peculiar difficulties to overcome. With a few exceptions, Dr Black's lectures were left in a very disordered and imperfect state ; generally written indistinctly upon scraps of paper; often in the form of notes or memorandums, from which he had spoken extempore; frequent. ly consisting of references to the experiments that went on during the leffon.

To counterbalance these disadvantages, the Editor possessed' some very important qualifications and happy facilities. He had knowi Dr Black most intimately for a long course of years; during which he had been, first, his favourite pupil, then his successor, and, lastly, his colleague. He enjoyed the friends' ship of the distinguished circle of philosophers among whom this great man, after achieving the most brilliant discoveries of, mno-' dern times, happily and elegantly pafled the quiet remainder of his days. From these friends, Mr Robison obtained all the in, formation and assistance that the nature of his office required.? He had free access to every docuinent which could enable him to ** furnith the public with an accurate transcript of these celebrated' lectures, or to aid his own recollections in presenting a 1ketch of their author, and in completing a history of the steps by which Iris discoveries were made. By a coincidence, equally rare and, fortunate, journals of Dr Black's scientific pursuits were preferv. ed from the time of his firit application to fpeculative matters ;. and Mr Robison has been cnabled to fupply fomc of the 'dates - you. sti. NO: 51...... B..-A . SUA Ci s vobis which

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