Congress of Arts and Science: Universal Exposition, St. Louis, 1904, Volume 6

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Howard Jason Rogers
Houghton, Mifflin, 1906
 

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Page 730 - ... the analysis of soils and water; the chemical composition of manures, natural or artificial, with experiments designed to test their comparative effects on crops of different kinds; the adaptation and value of grasses and forage plants; the composition and digestibility of the different kinds of food for domestic animals; the scientific and economic questions involved in the production of butter and cheese; and such other researches or experiments bearing directly on the agricultural industry...
Page 574 - There be three things which are too wonderful for me, yea, four which I know not: The way of an eagle in the air; the way of a serpent upon a rock; the way of a ship in the midst of the sea; and the way of a man with a maid.
Page 563 - Engineer, being the art of directing the great sources of power in Nature for the use and convenience of man...
Page 730 - That it shall be the object and duty of said experiment stations to conduct original researches or verify experiments on the physiology of plants and animals; the diseases to which they are severally subject, with the remedies for the same...
Page 540 - Thus this custom of firing houses continued, till in process of time, says my manuscript, a sage arose, like our Locke, who made a discovery, that the flesh of swine, or indeed of any other animal, might be cooked (burnt, as they called it) without the necessity of consuming a whole house to dress it.
Page 376 - In the four quarters of the globe, who reads an American book, or goes to an American play, or looks at an American picture or statue...
Page 172 - Christ ; from whom all the body fitly framed and knit together through that which every joint supplieth, according to the working in due measure of each several part, maketh the increase of the body unto the building up of itself in love.
Page 184 - Did we know the mechanical affections of the particles of rhubarb, hemlock, opium, and a man ; as a watch-maker does those of a watch, whereby it performs its operations, and of a file which by rubbing on them will alter the figure of any of the wheels ; we should be able to tell before hand, that rhubarb will purge, hemlock kill, and opium make a man sleep...
Page 247 - It would be highly difficult to generalize the capital account in this district, but probably it would not be far out of the way to say that the...
Page 506 - On the other hand, there are those which are mostly found in children, or with a symptomatology and course peculiar to them...

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