The British Journal of Homoeopathy, Volume 29

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John James Drysdale, Robert Ellis Dudgeon, Richard Hughes, John Rutherfurd Russell
Maclachlan, Stewart, & Company, 1871
 

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Page 55 - I am inclined to believe that we do not have catechumens taught to say "to do my duty in that state of life into which it has pleased God to call me" until we have the beginning of movements of individuals away from their birth positions in society.
Page 406 - ... ever so great, takes note of nothing in every individual disease, except the changes in the health of the body and of the mind (morbid phenomena, accidents, symptoms) which can be perceived externally by means of the senses; that is to say, he notices only the deviations from the former healthy state of the now diseased individual, which are felt by the patient himself, remarked by those around him and observed by the physician. All these perceptible signs represent the disease in its whole extent,...
Page 561 - If the whole bulk of the urine be to the urate of ammonia formed not less than about 2700 to 1, the secretion will, at the ordinary temperature of the air, remain clear, but if the bulk of fluid be less, an amorphous deposit of the urate will occur. On the other hand, if an excess of uric acid be separated by the kidneys, it will act on the phosphate of soda of the double salt, and hence, on cooling, the urine will deposit a crystalline sediment of uric acid sand, very probably mixed with amorphous...
Page 226 - Act to grant Qualifications, to impose upon any Candidate offering himself for Examination an Obligation to adopt or refrain from adopting the Practice of any particular Theory of Medicine or Surgery, as a Test or Condition of admitting him to Examination or of granting a Certificate, it shall be lawful for the said Council to represent the same to Her Majesty's most...
Page 562 - ... remain clear, but if the bulk of fluid be less, an amorphous deposit of the urate will occur. On the other hand, if an excess of uric acid be separated by the kidneys, it will act on the phosphate of soda of the double salt, and hence, on cooling, the urine will deposit a crystalline sediment of acid sand, very probably mixed with amorphous urate of ammonia, the latter usually forming a layer above the crystals, which always sink to the bottom of the vessel.*"] 82.
Page 438 - Yesterday, when walking, pain in both ovaries, worse in the left, extending down the anterior and inner aspect of the left thigh, as if it would be impossible to take another step ; as soon as she extended the limb she must immediately flex it again and then, because of a restless discomfort, must again extend it.
Page 572 - At the commencement I was very cautious in its use and did not give to adults above from fifteen to sixteen grains per diem, in almond milk ; but I soon perceived that, in order to produce a speedy recovery, it was necessary to give, even to weak subjects, thirty grains, and to more robust individuals forty grains in the twenty-four hours. The favorable result was never long delayed...
Page 440 - The heart's action was intermittent ; every intermission was followed by a violent throb, causing an involuntary catching of the breath, at the same time the blood rushed up through the carotids, to the head, producing great heat, and a crowded feeling of the head and face ; these symptoms followed me for more than a...
Page 570 - The cautious physician, who will go gradually to work, gives the ordinary remedy only in such a dose as will scarcely perceptibly develop the artificial disease, and gradually increases the dose, so that he may be sure that the intended internal changes in the organism are produced with sufficient force, although with phenomena vastly inferior in intensity to the symptoms of the natural disease; thus a mild and certain cure will be effected.
Page 629 - Biology has come into common use, it seems desirable to employ the same root in designating the matter which it is the main purpose of biology to investigate. Bioplasm involves no theory as regards the nature or the origin of the matter. It simply distinguishes it as living. A living white bloodcorpuscle is a mass of bioplasm, or it might be termed a bioplast. A very minute living particle is a bioplast, and we may speak of living matter as bioplasmic substance.

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