The General Biographical Dictionary: Containing an Historical and Critical Account of the Lives and Writings of the Most Eminent Persons in Every Nation, Particularly the British and Irish, from the Earliest Accounts to the Present Time, Volume 26

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Page 160 - ... his auditors ; and to such persons he certainly did not appear to advantage, being often impetuous and overbearing. The desire of shining in conversation was in him indeed a predominant passion; and if it must be attributed to vanity, let it at the same time be recollected, that it produced that loquaciousness from which his more intimate friends derived considerable advantage. The observations which he made on poetry, on life, and on every thing about us, I applied to our art; with what success...
Page 197 - The character of Lothario seems to have been expanded by Richardson into Lovelace ; but he has excelled his original in the moral effect of the fiction. Lothario, with gaiety which cannot be hated, and bravery which cannot be despised, retains too much of the spectator's kindness.
Page 153 - Parliament by the time limited in the former qualifications, and shall take and subscribe the engagement, to be true and faithful to the Commonwealth of England...
Page 440 - ... men have that sort of dignity which a 'bushy beard will confer; but he never possessed a poetical conception of character. In his representations of the highest characters in the Christian or the fabulous world, instead of something above humanity, which might fill the idea which is conceived of such beings, the spectator finds little more than mere mortals, such as he meets with every day.
Page 217 - Be of good heart, brother, for God will either assuage the fury of the flame, or else strengthen us to abide it.
Page 269 - THE ANCIENTS HAD OF INDIA ; and the Progress of Trade with that Country prior to the Discovery of the Passage to it by the Cape of Good Hope.
Page 115 - The sessions of the College were, at that time, very short, and the education (according to Dr Reid's own account) slight and superficial. It does not appear, from the information which I have received, that he gave any early indications of future eminence.
Page 287 - ... and sincere attachment, declaring he was determined to do her that justice which he ought to have done long ago, which was, presenting her to all his family as his wife.
Page 441 - It must be observed, that we are speaking solely of the manner, the effect of the picture ; and we may conclude, according to the custom in pastoral poetry, by bestowing on each of these illustrious painters a garland, without attributing superiority to either. " To conclude, I will venture to repeat in favour of Rubens, what I have before said in regard to the Dutch...
Page 267 - In undertaking this task, the Author's original intention was only to complete his account of the great events connected with the reign of Charles V. ; but perceiving, as he advanced, that a History of America, confined solely to the operations and concerns of the Spaniards, would not be likely to excite a very general interest, he resolved to include in his plan the transactions of all the European nations in the New World.

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