The American First-class Book, Or Exercises in Reading and Recitation: Selected Principally from Modern Authors of Great Britain and America, and Designed for the Use of the Highest Class in Public and Private Schools

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J.B.Lippincott, 1855
 

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Contents

The same concluded ID
46
Inscription Entrance into a Wood BRYANT
53
The Young Minstrel Beattie
59
On Early Rising Hurdis
65
A Summer Morning Thomson
66
Feelings excited by a Long Voyage W IRVING 17 Penns Treaty with the Indians Edinburgh Review 20 Pleasures of acquiring Knowledge Alison
68
On the Uses of Knowledge Ib
71
Incentives to Devotion H K White
80
Ode to Sickness Anonymous
81
Life useful to Man pleasing to God Hawkesworth 25 Reply of Red Jacket to a Missionary PHILANTHROPIST 27 The Mice Fenelon
91
The Lord and the Judge Lomonosov
92
Hope triumphant in Death Campbell H
93
Lines written during a Thunderstorm Dimitriev
95
Waverley and Fergus MacIvor W Scott
96
Address to a Mummy New Monthly Magazine
107
Green River BRYANT BRYANT
109
Relation between Sleep and Night Paley
111
Social Worship agreeable to our Nature Mrs Barbauld
113
Good Sense and Beauty Literary Gazette
114
Punishment of a Spy W Scott
117
April Day Anonymous
120
The Dead Lamb 16
122
The White Bear Percival
123
The Land of Dreams BRYANT
126
Nature and Poetry favorable to Virtue Beattie
127
Discourse at Plymouth Dec 22 1820 WEBSTER 45 Excuses offered for neglecting Religion BUCKMINSTER 46 Same subject continued 1B
133
Same subject concluded IB
136
Apostrophe to Mount Parnassus Byron
140
Mont Blanc before Sunrise Coleridge
141
The Last Days of Herculaneum Scrap Book
144
New Mode of Fishing Ib
145
A Winter Scene BRYANT
146
The Seasons MONTHLY ANTHOLOGY
148
The Widow and her Son WASHINGTON IRVING
151
The same concluded
155
The American Republic Byron
159
An Evening Sketch Blackwoods Magazine 10
160
Autumn Alison
161
Moss Side J Wilson
166
The same concluded 10
171
All Things are of God Moore
176
The Coral Grove J G PERCIVAL
177
Sonnet written in a Churchyard Blackwoods Magazine
178
Romantic Story Quarterly Review
186
Anecdotes of Mozart Scrap Book
187
Death and Burial of a Child at Sea Scrap Book
190
Death and Character of Howard Clarke
193
The Moneyed Man New Monthly Magazine
197
Daily Prayer Morning CHANNING
199
Daily Prayer Evening IB
203
Baneful Influence of Sceptical Philoso phy Campbell
205
Affecting Picture of Constancy in Lie Crabbe
207
Knickerbockers New England Farmer W IRVING
210
Moral Sentiment without Active Virtue Alison
212
Infidelity Andrew Thompson
216
Same subject concluded lh
218
Deathscene in Gertrude of Wyoming Campbell
221
To a Waterfowl BRYANT
223
Hohenlinden Campbell
224
Thanatopsis BRYANT
225
Heroic Selfdenial Literary Gazette
248
Pairing Time anticipated Cowper
250
Ossian
253
Story of Grant and Macpherson Author unknown
255
Fog in the Harbor H W BEECHER
258
Apostrophe to the Sun J G PERCIVAL
261
Apostrophe to the Ocean Byron
265
The Use and Abuse of Amusements Alison
266
The Needless Alarm A Tale Cowper
272
Peace on Earth J PIERPONT
276
The Religious Cottage i D HUNTINGTON
279
Forest Trees W IRVING
280
Old Mortality Tales of My Landlord
283
The same concluded
288
The Deaf Mans Grave Wordsworth
293
The Sleighride or Two Ways of Tel ling a Story H K OLIVER
299
A Mining Scene Blackwoods Magazine
304
A Rhyme for the Time J C Prince
308
PARK BENJAMIN
312
Strype
314
Meum and Tuum Bentleys Miscellany
315
The same concluded Ib
322
The Child who swept the Crossing PASCHAL DONALDSON
325
The Voices at the Throne T Westwood
328
Milton on the Loss of his Sight Milton
329
Anonymous
331
The Frogpond BOSTON DAILY TIMES
333
Snowflakes HAWTHORNE
336
Honesty W J Linton
342
Flowers Horace Smith
348
The Bells on Sunday Morning Agnes Franz
350
To Dr King at Athens N Y EvE MIRROR
351
The Little Boy and his Hapenny CHARLESTON COURIER
354
Drunkenness Jeremy Taylor
356
The Orphan Boy NAT INTELLIGENCER
359
R Hoyt
362
The Discontented Pendulum Jane Taylor
364
The Death of the Dominie Thomas Hood
368
The Sulks Blackwoods Magazine
370
The Huskers J G WHITTIER
372
Song of Death Household Words
376
Thoughts on Letterwriting Ib
381
Destruction of Goldau BUCKMINSTER
385
Ginevra Rogers
392
The
399
Truth MRS F S OsGQOD
402
The same concluded IB
407
Speech of Catiline before the Roman
412
Soliloquy of Macbeth when going
421
Address of Brutus to the Romans Shakspeare
435
Antonys Address to the Romans H Shakspeare
436
The Poet and the Alchemist New Monthly Magazine
449
A Geological Excursion siin SA Geological Excursion Thomas Hood
451
Preface to the First Edition of A Fable for Critics JAMES R LOWELL
453
A Preliminary Note to the Second Edi tion ID
455
The Contrasts of Alpine Scenery Byron
464
Speech of Catiline before the Roman
470
Irish National Hyun J C Mangan
486
The Ass and the Nightingale Krilov
494
Address to the Deity Bobrov
503

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Page 219 - TO him who in the love of nature holds Communion with her visible forms, she speaks A various language; for his gayer hours She has a voice of gladness, and a smile And eloquence of beauty, and she glides Into his darker musings, with a mild And healing sympathy, that steals away Their sharpness, ere he is aware.
Page 413 - Caesar carelessly but nod on him. He had a fever when he was in Spain, And when the fit was on him, I did mark How he did shake; 'tis true, this god did shake; His coward lips did from their...
Page 217 - midst falling dew, While glow the heavens with the last steps of day, Far, through their rosy depths, dost thou pursue Thy solitary way ? Vainly the fowler's eye Might mark thy distant flight to do thee wrong, As, darkly painted on the crimson sky, Thy figure floats along.
Page 172 - Thou art, O God, the life and light Of all this wondrous world we see ; Its glow by day, its smile by night, Are but reflections caught from thee. Where'er we turn, thy glories shine, And all things fair and bright are thine.
Page 402 - Now o'er the one half world Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse The curtain'd sleep; witchcraft celebrates Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder, Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf, Whose howl's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace. With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design Moves like a ghost.
Page 422 - For I can raise no money by vile means: By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas, than to wring From the hard hands of peasants their' vile trash By any indirection.
Page 401 - Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand ? Come, let me clutch thee. I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight ? or art thou but A dagger of the mind, a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain ? I see thee yet, in form as palpable As this which now I draw. Thou marshall'st me the way that I was going ; And such an instrument I was to use. Mine eyes are made the fools o...
Page 477 - Hark, they whisper ; angels say, " Sister spirit, come away ! " What is this absorbs me quite, Steals my senses, shuts my sight, Drowns my...
Page 38 - Of old hast THOU laid the foundation of the earth : And the heavens are the work of thy hands. They shall perish, but THOU shalt endure : Yea, all of them shall wax old like a garment ; As a vesture shalt THOU change them, and they shall be changed : But THOU art the same, And thy years shall have no end.
Page 470 - Presently my soul grew stronger: hesitating then no longer, "Sir," said I, "or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore ; But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping, And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door, That I scarce was sure I heard you" here I opened wide the door Darkness there and nothing more.

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