The State and Charity

Front Cover
Macmillan and Company, limited, 1898 - 201 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 32 - ... the most decent and advantageous composition which he can make with the spiritual guides is to bribe their indolence, by assigning stated salaries to their profession...
Page 23 - Majesty, and her most noble progenitors, as by sundry other well-disposed persons: some for relief of aged, impotent and poor people, some for maintenance of sick and maimed soldiers and mariners, schools of learning, free schools, and scholars in universities, some for repair of bridges, ports, havens, causeways, churches, seabanks and highways, some for education and preferment of orphans...
Page 23 - Relief of aged, impotent and poor people ; maintenance of sick and maimed soldiers and mariners' schools of learning, free schools, and scholars in universities; repair of bridges, ports, havens, causeways, churches, seabanks, and highways ; education and preferment of orphans ; relief, stock, or maintenance for houses of correction ; marriages of poor maids ; supportation, aid, and help of young tradesmen...
Page 32 - ... to bribe their indolence, by assigning stated salaries to their profession, and rendering it superfluous for them to be farther active, than merely to prevent their flock from straying in quest of new pastures.
Page 86 - Accomplishments, the fine arts, belles-lettres, and all those things which, as we say, constitute the efflorescence of civilization, should be wholly subordinate to that knowledge and discipline in which civilization rests. As they occupy the leisure part of life, so should they occupy the leisure part of education.
Page 31 - Have those public endowments contributed., in general, to promote the end of their institution? Have they contributed to encourage the diligence, and to improve the abilities, of the teachers ? Have they directed the course of education towards objects more useful, both to the individual and to the public...
Page 127 - All property of any corporation in the place which is dissolved by this act, or of any person as member or officer thereof, or of any court or judge whose jurisdiction is abolished by this act, shall be applied for the public benefit of the inhabitants of the place in such manner as may be for the time being provided by a scheme of the Charity Commissioners...
Page 86 - The vital knowledge— that by which we have grown as a nation to what we are, and which now underlies our whole existence, is a knowledge that has got itself taught in nooks and corners; while the ordained agencies for teaching have been mumbling little else but dead formulas.
Page 86 - That which our school courses leave almost entirely out, we thus find to be that which most nearly concerns the business of life. All our industries would cease, were it not for that information which men begin to acquire as they best may after their education is said to be finished. And were it not for this information, that has been from age to age accumulated and spread by unofficial means, these industries would never have...

Bibliographic information