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- COMEDIES.

All's Well that Ends Well. . . . . . .• * * * * * * * * * * • - 1

As you Like It. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • * * * 8

Comedy of Errors. . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - . . . . . . . . 18

Love's Labour's Lost. . . . . . . • - - - - - - - - ... • * * * * * * * 20

Measure for Measure. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . ‘. . . . . . . 25

Merchant of Venice. . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Merry Wives of Windsor. See Preface, p. viii.

Midsummer Night's Dream. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • - - - - 51

Much ado about Nothing. • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . 59

Taming of the Shrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66

Tempest • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - • * * * * * * * * * * * • - - - - - 70

Twelfth Night. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Two Gentlemen of Verona. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86

Winter's Tale. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

HISTORICAL PLAYS.

King John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 103

King Richard II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117

King Henry IV. (Part I.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125

King Henry IV. (Part II.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 186

King Henry V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146

King Henry VI. (Part I.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159

King Henry VI. (Part II.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159

King Henry VI. (Part III.). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 164

King Richard III. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • 171

King Henry VIII. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • - - - - - 181

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Be thou blest, Bertram! and succeed thy father In manners, as in shape! Thy blood, and virtue, Contend for empire in thee; and thy goodness Share with thy birthright! Love all, trust a few, Do wrong to none: be able for thine enemy Rather in power, than use; and keep thy friend Under thy own life's key: be check'd for silence, But never tax'd for speech.

TOO AMBITIOUS LOVE,

I am undone; there is no living, none, If Bertram be away. It were all one, That I should love a bright particular star, And think to wed it, he is so above me: In his bright radiance and collateral light Must I be comforted, not in his sphere. The ambition in my love thus plagues itself: The hind that would be mated by the lion, Must die for love. 'Twas pretty, though a plague, To see him every hour; to sit and draw

B

His arched brows, his hawking eye, his curls,
In our heart's table"; heart, too capable
Of every line and tricks of his sweet favourt:
But now he's gone, and my idolatrous fancy
Must sanctify his relics.

COWARDICE. I know him a motorious liar, Think him a great way fool, solely a coward; Yet these fix'd evils sit so fit in him, That they take place, when virtue's steely bones Look bleak in the cold wind.

• THE REMEDY OF EVILS GENERALLY IN OURSELVES,
Our remedies oft in ourselves do lie,
Which we ascribe to heaven: the fated sky
Gives us free scope; only, doth backward pull
Our slow designs, when we ourselves are dull.

CHARACTER OF A NOBLE COURTIER.
In his youth

He had the wit, which I can well observe
To-day in our young lords; but they may jest.
Till their own scorn return to them unnoted,
Ere they can hide their levity in honour.
So like a courtier, contempt nor bitterness
Were in his pride or sharpness; if they were,
His equal had awak'd them; and his honour,
Clock to itself, knew the true minute when
Exception bid him speak, and, at this time,
His tongue obey'd his hand $: who were below him
He us'd as creatures of another place:

* Helena considers her heart as the tableton which his resemblance was portra

+ Peculiarity of feature. :Dountenance. § His is put for its

And bow'd his eminent top to their low ranks,
Making them proud of his humility.
Such a man
Might be a copy to these younger times.

a

ACT II. HONORDUE TO PERSONAL WIRTUE oNLY, NOT TO BIRTH.

From lowest place when virtuous things proceed, The place is dignified by the doer's deed: Where great additions” swell, and virtue none, It is a dropsied honour: good alone Is good, without a name; vileness is sof: The property by what it is should go, Not by the title. She is young, wise, fair; In these to nature she's immediate heir; And these breed honour: that is honour's scorn, Which challenges itself as honour's born, And is not like the sire: Honours best thrive, When rather from our acts we them derive Than our foregoers: the mere word's a slave Debauch'd on every tomb; on every grave, A lying trophy, and as oft is dumb, Where dust, and damn'd oblivion, is the tomb Of honour’d bones indeed.

ACT III.
SELF-ACCUSATION OF TOO GREAT LOWE.
Poor lord! is't I
That chase thee from thy country, and expose
Those tender limbs of thine to the event
* Titles. -

+ Good is good independent of any worldly distinction, and so is vileness vile.

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