The Life of a Lover: In a Series of Letters, Volume 4

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G. & J. Robinson, 1804
 

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Page 277 - She, while her Lover pants upon her breast, Can mark the figures on an Indian chest; And when she sees her Friend in deep despair, Observes how much a Chintz exceeds Mohair.
Page 50 - TWAS at the silent solemn hour, When night and morning meet ; In glided Margaret's grimly ghost, And stood at William's feet. Her face was like an April morn Clad in a wintry cloud ; And clay-cold was her lily hand That held her sable shroud.
Page 161 - The love of praise, howe'er conceal'd by art, Reigns, more or less, and glows, in every heart : The proud, to gain it, toils on toils endure ; The modest shun it, but to make it sure.
Page 192 - You stars, who these entangled fortunes give, O tell me why It is so hard to die, Yet such a task to live? If with some pleasure we our griefs betray, It costs us dearer than it can repay, For time or fortune all things so devours, Our hopes are crossed, * Or else the object lost, Ere we can call it ours.
Page 295 - ... heart at rest. But I am tied to very thee By every thought I have ; Thy face I only care to see, Thy heart I only crave. All that in woman is adored In thy dear self I find For the whole sex can but afford The handsome and the kind. Why then should I seek further store, And still make love anew ? When change itself can give no more, Tis easy to be true.
Page 192 - Tis true our life is but a long disease, Made up of real pain and seeming ease. You stars, who these entangled fortunes give, O tell me why It is so hard to die, Yet such a task to live? If with some pleasure we our griefs betray, It costs us dearer than it can repay, For time or fortune all things so devours, Our hopes are...
Page 179 - Mock Epitaph on a Fellow of Trinity College. Here lies a Doctor of Divinity, Who was a Fellow too of Trinity ; He knew as much about Divinity As other fellows do of Trinity. Parson. On Self-Conceit. Hail ! charming power of self-opinion ! For none are slaves in thy dominion: Secure in thee, the mind 's at ease ; The vain have only one to please.
Page 159 - With all the charms of labour'd ease ; Through looks and nods with meaning fraught, To teach what she was never taught. By her each latent spring is seen, The workings foul of secret spleen ; The guilt that sculks in fair pretence, Or folly veil'd in specious sense. And much her righteous spirit grieves, When worthlessness the world deceives ; Whether the erring crowd commends Some patriot sway'd by private ends ; Or...
Page 107 - Were she not ugly, she would him despise ; Nor would he marry her if he had eyes. To their defects they 're for the match in debt, And, but for faults on both sides, ne'er had met.

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