The credibility of the Gospel history: or, The facts occasionally mention'd in the New Testament confirmed by passages of ancient authors, who were contemporary with our Saviour or his apostles, or lived near their time. 2 pt. [with].

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Page 895 - They answered and said unto him, Abraham is our father. Jesus saith unto them, If ye were Abraham's children, ye would do the works of Abraham.
Page 440 - ... at the right hand of the Father and will come to judge the living and the dead?
Page 776 - For laying aside the commandment of God, ye hold the tradition of men, as the washing of pots and cups: and many other such like things ye do. 9 And he said unto them, Full well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition.
Page 713 - Behold, he cometh with clouds ; and every eye fhall fee him ; and they alfo which pierced him : and all kindreds of the earth fhall wail becaufe of him.
Page 675 - Now when Paul and his company loosed from Paphos, they came to Perga in Pamphylia: and John departing from them returned to Jerusalem.
Page 418 - NT, confirmed by paflages of Ancient Authors, who were contemporary with our Saviour or his Apoftles, or lived near their time.
Page 782 - Ghoft, and to us, to lay upon you no greater '* burden than thefe neceflary things ; that ye abftain " from meats offered to idols, and from blood, and " from things ftrangled, and from fornication : from ** which if ye keep yourfelves, ye {hall do well.
Page 644 - As we have not now before us any of Paul's writings, and have his history from adversaries only, we cannot propose to judge distinctly" of his talents, nor draw his character at length. However, from the several particulars before put down, and collected from divers authors, some things may be concluded. And I apprehend that, laying aside for the present the consideration of his heterodoxy, we shall not mistake much if we conceive of him after this manner. He had a great mind, with a mixture of haughtiness...
Page 676 - HAT which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have feen with our Eyes, which we have looked upon, and our hands have handled...
Page 644 - ... present the consideration of his heterodoxy, we shall not mistake much if we conceive of him after this manner. He had a great mind, with a mixture of haughtiness, and too much affection for human applause. He was generally well respected in his diocese, and by the neighbouring bishops ; in esteem with the great, and beloved by the common people. He preached frequently, and was a good speaker. And from what is said by the fathers of the council, of his rejecting or laying aside some hymns, as...

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