Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

Bulletin 119

March, 1905 NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION

FORESTRY I. The Value of Native Pine Seedlings. II. Experiments : Digging, Packing and Trans

planting III. Comparative Expense: Wild Seedlings vs.

Nursery Purchased Stock

[graphic][merged small][merged small]

NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE

OF AGRICULTURE AND THE MECHANIC ARTS

DURHAM

[blocks in formation]

AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.

BOARD OF CONTROL.

Hox. JOHN G. TALLANT, Chairman, Pembroke.
CHARLES W. STONE, A. M., Secretary, East Andover.
HON. WARREN BROWN, Hampton Falls.
PRES. WILLIAM D. GIBBS, ex-officio, Durham.

STATION COUNCIL.

WILLIAM D. GIBBS, M. S., Director.

,
FRED W. MORSE, M. S., Chemist and Vice-Director.
FRANK WM. RANE, B. AG., M. S. Horticulturist.
FREDERICK W. TAYLOR, B. S., Agriculturist.
E. DWIGHT SANDERSON, M. S., Entomologist.
IVAN C. WELD, Dairy Manufactures.
EDWARD L. SHAW, B. S., Associate Agriculturist.
HARRY F. HALL, Associate Horticulturist.

ASSISTANTS.

JOHN C. BRIDWELL, B. S., Assistant Entomologist.
A. C. BLAISDELL, A. M., Assistant Chemist.
EDITH M. DAVIS, Purchasing Agent.
MABEL H. MEHAFFEY, Stenographer.

FORESTRY

COLLEGE OF A AGRICULTURE
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

FORESTRY EXPERIMENTS

BY F. WM. RANE,
Professor of Horticulture and Forestry, New Hampshire College.

The object and purpose of this bulletin is to give the information which everybody in New England should have in regard to our native pine seedlings. We have been unable to find any literature on forestry sufficiently brief which, placed in the hands of a landowner, would enable him to go to work and do something by himself in a practical way. It was to give exactly this sort of information that Bulletins Nos. 95 and 106 were published. No. 95, “How to grow a forest from seed,'' was written with the purpose of giving the reader a general idea of forestry. Enough definite experimental data are found here so that a person can determine means, methods and expense.

No. 106, “How to make a beginning,” and “Waste lands; how to convert them into forests." This bulletin classifies our lands that would make valuable forests, but at present are practically worthless, and tells how to handle each so as to get forests started upon them.

Both of the above bulletins are the results of studying practical New England forestry conditons. The writer went directly into the woods in different parts of the state, made a study of different kinds of soils in which trees are and have been growing, secured definite data and facts from farmers themselves, observed trees growing in all stages and conditions, etc. The nature of what people wanted to know was also determined from letters of inquiry of the college, from inquiries when traveling about the state, and discussions at public agricultural meetings.

[graphic]

Fig. 2. Two years after the forest was cut. Fire kept out and slash allowed to rot. In fine condition for restocking.

Wild seedlings were set out here. Natural restocking in the background.

« PreviousContinue »