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" O shame to human life, to human laws ! The loose adventurer, hireling of a day, Who his fell sword without affection draws. Whose God, whose country, is a tyrant's pay. This man the lessons of the field can learn ; Can every palm, which decks a warrior,... "
The Critical Review, Or, Annals of Literature - Page 456
1803
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THE MONTHLY REVIEW

SEVERAL HANDS - 1758
...fell fword without affection draws, Whofe God, whofe country is a tyrant's pay, This man the leffons of the field can learn; Can every palm, which decks a warrior, earn, And every pledge of conqueft: while in vain, To guard your altars, rights* paternal lands, Are focial arms held out to...
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Annual Register, Volume 1

Edmund Burke - 1759
...fell fword without affeftion draws, Whofe God, whofe country is a tyrant's pay, This man the leflbns of the field can learn ; Can every palm, which decks a warrior, earn, And every pledge of conqueft : while in vain, To guard your altars, rights, paternal lands, Are focial arms held out to...
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The Works of the English Poets: Akenside

Samuel Johnson - 1779
...fell fword without affection draws, Whofe God, whofe country, is a tyrant's pay, This man the leffons of the field can learn ; Can every palm, which decks a warrior, earn, And every pledge of conqueft i while in vain, To guard your altars, your paternal lands, Are focial arms held out to your...
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The works of the English poets. With prefaces, biographical and ..., Volume 64

English poets - 1790
...fell fword without affeftion draws, Whofe God,.whofe country, is a tyrant's pay, This man the leffons of the field can learn ; Can every palm, which decks a warrior, earn. And every pledge of conqueft : while in vain, To guard your altars, your paternal lands, Are focial arms held out to your...
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Moore. Cawthorne. Collins. Dyer. Shenstone. Mallet. Akenside. Gray ...

Samuel Johnson - 1800
...fell fword without affection draws, Whofe God, whofe country, is a tyrant's pay, This man the Uffons of the field can learn : Can every palm, which decks a warrior, earn And every pledge of conqucft : while in vain To guard your altars, your paternal lands, Ale 1'ocial arms held out to your...
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Moore. Cawthorne. Collins. Dyer. Shenstone. Mallet. Akenside. Gray ...

Samuel Johnson - 1800
...And every pledge of conqueft : while in vain To guard your altars, your paternal lands, Are locial arms held out to your free hands: Too arduous is the lore ; too irkfonie were the pain. XII. Meantime by Pleasure's lying tales allur'd, From the bright fun and living...
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The works of the poets of Great Britain and Ireland. With prefaces ..., Volume 7

Great Britain - 1804
...Iword without affeflion draws, Wh'ife God, whofe country, is a tyrant's pay, This man the leffon« «if the field can learn : Can every palm, which decks a warrior, earn And every pledge of conqueu : while io vain To guard your altars, your p«tcrnal lands, Are iocial arms held out to your...
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The Poetical Works, with The Virtuoso: A Fragment, Never Before Published ...

Mark Akenside - 1807 - 239 pages
...hopeless hearts retire i XI. O shame to human life, to human laws ! The loose adventurer, hireling of a day, Who his fell sword without affection draws,...Too arduous is the lore; too irksome were the pain, XII. Meantime by pleasure's lying tales allur'd, From, the bright sun and living breeze ye stray ;...
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The Poetical Works of Mark Akenside, M.D.: In Two Volumes. Collated with the ...

Mark Akenside, Thomas Park - 1808
...with hopeless hearts retire ? O shame to human life, to human laws ! The loose adventurer, hireling of a day, Who his fell sword without affection draws,...Too arduous is the lore; too irksome were the pain. Meantime by pleasure's lying tales allur'd, From the bright sun and living breeze ye stray ; And deep...
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English Minstrelsy: Being a Selection of Fugitive Poetry from the ..., Volume 1

Walter Scott - 1810 - 264 pages
...with hopeless hearts retire ? 0 shame to human life, to human laws ! The loose adventurer, hireling of a day, Who his fell sword without affection draws,...Too arduous is the lore ; too irksome were the pain. VOL. i. - H Meantime by pleasure's lying tales allured, From the bright sun and living breeze ye stray...
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