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" they, from external objects, convey into the mind what produces there those perceptions. This great source of most of the ideas we have, depending wholly upon our senses, and derived by them to the understanding, I call SENSATION. " Secondly, the other... "
The Collected Works of Dugald Stewart: Philosophical essays. 1855 - Page 63
by Dugald Stewart - 1855
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Volume 1

John Locke - 1805 - 510 pages
...external objects convey into the mind what produces there those perceptions. This great source of most ot the ideas we have, depending wholly upon our senses,...derived by them to the understanding, I call SENSATION'. Tlie §.4. Secondly, The other fountain, from tions of our which experience furnisheth the understandminds...
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An essay concerning human understanding. Also, extr. from the author's works ...

John Locke - 1819
...external objects convey into the mind •what produces there those perceptions. This great source of mo*t of the ideas we have, depending wholly upon our senses,...derived by them to the understanding, I call SENSATION. f. 4. The operations of our minds the other source of them, Secondly, The other fountain, from which...
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding

John Locke - 1823 - 648 pages
...we call sensible qualities, which-, whenj say, the senses convey into the mind, I mean, they, front external objects, convey into the mind what produces...derived by them to the understanding, I call SENSATION. §. 4. The operations of our minds the other source of them.— Secondly, The other fountain, from...
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The Medico-chirurgical Review, Volume 3

1824
...those which we call sensible qualities; which, when I say the senses convey into the mind, I mean, thoy from external objects convey into the mind what produces...most of the ideas we have depending wholly upon our sensR?, ami source of t'aeas, every roan has wholly in himself: and though it be not sense, as having...
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A Series of Lectures upon Locke's Essay

Dionysius Lardner - 1824 - 164 pages
...definitions of sensation, and indeed seem to be given as such by the author. Such are the following: " This great source of most of the ideas we have depending...derived by them to the understanding, I call SENSATION. B. 2. Ch. I. § 3. Sensation; which is such an impression or me tion made in some part of the body,...
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Essay on Instinct, and Its Physical and Moral Relations

Thomas Hancock - 1824 - 551 pages
...opening left to let in external visible resemblances, or ideas of things without," Book 2. Ch. xii " Tbe great source of most of the ideas we have, depending...derived by them to the understanding, I call Sensation. The other fountain from which experience furnisheth the understanding with ideas, is, the perception...
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Essay on instinct, and its physical and moral relations

Thomas Hancock - 1824
...left to let in external visible resemblances, or ideas of things without," Book 2. Ch. xii—" The great source of most of the ideas we have, depending wholly upon out senses, aud derived by them to the understanding, I call Sensation. The other fountain from which...
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The London encyclopaedia, or, Universal dictionary of ..., Volume 20, Part 1

Thomas Curtis (of Grove house sch, Islington)
...flams, from a motion which has some resemblance to that which in animals follows upon sensation. IH. This great source of most of the ideas we have depending wholly upon our srntet, and derived by them to the understanding, I call sensation. Id. The sensitiie plant is so called...
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The Monthly Review

1829
...have depending wholly upon our senses, and derived by them to the understanding, I call sensation. " The other fountain from which experience furnisheth the understanding with ideas, is the perception of the operations of our own minds within us, as it is employed about the ideas it has got;...
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The Origin, Science, and End of Moral Truth; Or, an Exposition of the Inward ...

Christianity - 1831 - 231 pages
...mankind are so constituted as to be individually affected, and to affect each other by sensations not depending wholly upon our senses, and derived by them to the understanding, may be shewn by the testimony of Locke himself. In his Treatise on Education this great philosopher...
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