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Books Books 1 - 10 of 55 on This idea, though weak and disguised, suffices to diminish the pain which we suffer....
" This idea, though weak and disguised, suffices to diminish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. "
The Monthly Mirror: Reflecting Men and Manners; with Strictures on Their ... - Page 407
1802
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The Magazine of Magazines: Compiled from Original Pieces, with ..., Volume 13

1757
...of thofe whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to fuch a pitch as converts it into a pleafure. We weep for the misfortune of a Hero, to whom we are attached: In the fame inftant we comfort ourfelves by reflecting, that it is nothing but a fiction j and it is precifely...
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Four Dissertations: I. The Natural History of Religion. II. Of the Passions ...

David Hume - 1757 - 240 pages
...thofe whom we love, and to " reduce that affliction to fuch a pitch as con." verts it into a pleafure. We weep for the " misfortune of a hero, to whom we are at*« tached : In the fame inftant we comfort our" felves, by reflecting, that it is nothing but a...
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Essays and Treatises on Several Subjects: Essays, moral, political, and ...

David Hume - 1760 - 352 pages
...thofe whom we love, and to reduce that affliction " to fuch a pitch as converts it into a pleafure. We " weep for the misfortune of a hero, to whom we " are attached. In the fame ihftaot We comfort oqr^ *' felves,- by reflecting, that it is aothing b)jt a fict ion : " And...
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Essays, moral, political, and literary

David Hume - 1768
...to fuch a pitch as converts it into a pleafure. We weep for * * Reflexions fur lapoetique, §. 36. " the misfortune of a hero, to whom we are attached. In the " fame inftant we comfort ourfelves, by reflecting, that it is " nothing but a fiction : And it is...
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The Philosophy of Rhetoric, Volume 1

George Campbell - 1801
..."• we suffer from t!ue misfortunes oi' those w.hom we " love, and to reduce that affliction to suck a pitch as. " converts it into a pleasure. We weep for the mis" fortunes of a hero to whom we. are attached. In " the same instant we comfort ourselves by reflecting,...
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Essays and treatises on several subjects

David Hume - 1804
...weak and disguised, suffice to diminish the pain which " we suffer from the misfortunes of those whom we love, " and to reduce that affliction to such a...ourselves, by reflecting, that it is nothing " but a fiction : And it is precisely that mixture of sen* Reflections sur la pocticnifi, § 36. " timents,...
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The Philosophy of Rhetoric, Volume 1

George Campbell - 1808
...and disguised, " suffices to diminish the pam which we suffer " from the misfortunes of those whom we love, " and to reduce that affliction to such a...as converts it into a pleasure. We weep for " the misfortunes of a hero to whom we are at" tached. In the same instant we comfort our" selves by reflecting,...
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The Monthly Anthology, and Boston Review, Volume 5

David Phineas Adams, Samuel Cooper Thacher - 1808
...and disguised, suffices to diminish the pain, which we suffer from the niibfortunes of those, whom we love ; and to reduce that affliction to such a pitch as converts it into pleasure. We weep for the misfortunes of a hero, to whom we are attached. In the same instant we comfort...
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Essays, moral, political, and literary

David Hume - 1809
...weak and disguised, suffices to diminish the pain which " we suffer from the misfortunes of those whom we love, «* and to reduce that affliction to such...same instant " we comfort ourselves, by reflecting, tha} it is nothing " but a fiction : And it is precisely that mixture of -t. n • •• timents,...
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Essays, moral, political, and literary

David Hume - 1817
...disguised, suffices to di«« minish the pain which we suffer from the misfortunes of « those whom we love, and to reduce that affliction to such " a pitch as converts it into a pleasure. Welweep'for the " misfortune of a hero, to whom we are attached. In the «« same instant we comfort...
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