The History of Scotland, and an Historical Disquisition Concerning Ancient India

Front Cover
Baudry, 1828 - 695 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 501 - THE ANCIENTS HAD OF INDIA ; and the Progress of Trade with that Country prior to the Discovery of the Passage to it by the Cape of Good Hope.
Page 659 - Dharians, which denies the eternity of matter, or of that which ascribes the existence of the world to chance, they all equally enjoyed his countenance and favour ; insomuch that his people, in gratitude for the indiscriminate protection which he afforded them, distinguished him by the appellation of Juggot Grow, Guardian of Mankind.
Page 491 - I think it be extant yet, but I will not promise for an hour, but you think to shift in that sort. I answered,. we mind not to shift, but to offer from our sovereign all things that with reason may be; and in special, we offered as is set down in our general, all was refused, and tho't nothing.
Page 318 - Her money, her jewels, and her clothes, she distributed among her servants, according to their rank or merit. She wrote a short letter to the King of France, and another to the Duke of Guise, full of tender but magnanimous sentiments, and recommended her soul to their prayers, and her afflicted servants to their protection. At supper she ate temperately, as usual, and conversed not only with ease, but with cheerfulness ; she drank to every one of her servants, and asked their forgiveness, if ever...
Page 318 - ... the joys of Heaven, which repines because the body must endure the stroke of the executioner ; and though I did not expect that the queen of England would set the first example of violating the sacred person of a sovereign prince, I willingly submit to that which Providence has decreed to be my lot...
Page 604 - This pagoda is situated about a mile from the western extremity of the island of Seringham, formed by the division of the great river Caveri into two channels. " It is composed of seven square enclosures.
Page xxi - ... subject deserves undoubtedly the attention of all Europe. You are very much in the right of being afraid of the hackney translators of Holland and Paris; accordingly I thought it my duty to find out an able hand capable of answering your desire. M. Suard, a gentleman well known for his style in French, and his knowledge in the English language, has, at my request, undertaken the translation of your valuable book ; I know nobody in this country capable of performing better such a grand design....
Page 319 - ... long expected. Bear witness that I die constant in my religion, firm in my fidelity towards Scotland, and unchanged in my affection to France. Commend me to my son. Tell him I have done nothing injurious to his kingdom, to his honour, or to his rights ; and God forgive all those who have thirsted, without cause, for my blood.
Page xvii - ... perusal of your sheets before I printed, I was not able to derive sufficient benefits from them, or indeed to make any alteration by their assistance. There still remain, I fear, many errors, of which you could have convinced me, if we had canvassed the matter in conversation. Perhaps I might also have been sometimes no less fortunate with you. Particularly I could almost undertake to convince you, that .the earl of Murray's conduct with the duke of Norfolk was no way dishonourable.
Page 280 - The court did not acquiesce in this decree. A vacancy happening soon after in the see of Glasgow, Montgomery, minister at Stirling, a man vain, fickle, presumptuous, and more apt, by the blemishes in his character, to have alienated the people from an order already beloved, than to reconcile them to one which was the object of their hatred, made an infamous simoniacal bargain with Lennox, and on his recommendation was chosen archBOOK bishop.

Bibliographic information