prefaces biographical and critical to the works of the english poets

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Page 18 - Alas ! from the day that we met, What hope of an end to my woes? When I cannot endure to forget The glance that undid my repose. Yet time may diminish the pain: The flower, and the shrub, and the tree, Which I rear'd for her pleasure in vain, In time may have comfort for me.
Page 17 - I have found out a gift for my fair; I have found where the wood-pigeons breed; But let me that plunder forbear, She will say 'twas a barbarous deed...
Page 6 - Mallet, without any imaginable reason of preference which the eye or ear can discover. What other proofs he gave of disrespect to his native country, I know not ; but it was remarked of him, that he was the only Scot whom Scotchmen did not commend.
Page 60 - O how divine ! to tread the milky way, To the bright palace of the lord of day ; His court admire, or for his favour sue, Or leagues of friendship with his saints renew...
Page 9 - A physician in a great city seems to be the mere plaything of fortune; his degree of reputation is, for the most part, totally casual they that employ him know not his excellence; they that reject him know not his deficience. By any acute observer who had looked on the transactions of the medical world for half a century a very curious book might be written on the "Fortune of Physicians.
Page 23 - The Prospect of Eton College suggests nothing to Gray, which every beholder does not equally think and feel.
Page 43 - Short was his joy. He little knew The power of Magic was no fable ; Out of the window, whisk, they flew, But left a spell upon the table.
Page 13 - Westmoreland and Cumberland. He that reads his epistolary narration wishes, that to travel, and to tell his travels, had been more of his employment ; but it is by studying at home that we must obtain the ability of travelling with intelligence and improvement.
Page 17 - twas a barbarous deed. For he ne'er could be true, she averr'd, Who could rob a poor bird of its young ; And I lov'd her the more, when I heard Such tenderness fall from her tongue.
Page 6 - Now was excited his delight in rural pleasures, and his ambition of rural elegance : he began from this time to point his prospects, to diversify his surface, to entangle his walks, and to wind his waters ; which he did with such judgment and such fancy, as made his little domain the envy of the great, and the admiration of the skilful ; a place to be visited by travellers, and copied by designers.

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