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11. The folly of anger. The misery of a peevish

old age - - - - - - - 66

12. The history of a young woman that came to Lon-

don for a service - - - - - 73

13. The duty of secrecy. The invalidity of all excuses

for betraying secrets - - - - - 81

14. The difference between an author's writings and his

conversation - - - - - - 88

15. The folly of cards. A letter from a lady that has

lost her money - - - - - - 95

16. The dangers and miseries of a literary eminence - 103

17. The frequent contemplation of death necessary to

: moderate the passions - - - - 110

18. The unhappiness of marriage caused by irregular

motives of choice - : -

116

19. The danger of ranging from one study to another.

The importance of the early choice of a pro-

fession - - - - - - - 129

20. The folly and inconvenience of affectation - 131

21. The anxieties of literature not less than those of

publick stations. The inequality of authors

writings - - - - - - - 137

--- 22. An allegory on wit and learning - - - 144

23. The contrariety of criticism. The vanity of ob-

jection. An author obliged to depend upon his

own judgment - - - - - 150

4. The necessity of attending to the duties of com-

mon life. The natural character not to be for-

saken - - - - - - . 156

.-25. Rashness preferable to cowardice. Enterprise not

to be repressed to - - - - 162

26. The mischief of extravagance, and misery of de-

pendence - - - - - - 168

27. An author's treatment from six patrons - -
--- 28. The various arts of self-delusion -

181

29. The folly of anticipating misfortunes -

188

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30. The observance of Sunday recommended; an alle-

gory - - - - - - - 194

31. The defence of a known mistake highly culpable 199

32. The vanity of stoicism. The necessity of patience 207

33. An allegorical history of rest and labour - 213

34. The uneasiness and disgust of female cowardice - 219

35. A marriage of prudence without affection 226

36. The reasons why pastorals delight - - 232 ----

37. The true principles of pastoral poetry - - 238

38. The advantages of mediocrity. An eastern fable 245

39. The unhappiness of women whether single or

married - - - - - - - 251

40. The difficulty of giving advice without offending 257

41. The advantages of memory - - - - 263–. In

42. The misery of a modish lady in solitude - - 270

43. The inconveniencies of precipitation and confidence 276 -

44. Religion and superstition, a vision - - - 282

45. The causes of disagreement in marriage. - 289

46. The mischiefs of rural faction - - - 295

47. The proper means of regulating sorrow

301-. ,

48. The miseries of an infirm constitution

307

49. A disquisition upon the value of fame.' - - 313-

50. A virtuous old age always reverenced - - 319

51. The employments of a housewife in the country 325

52. The contemplation of the calamities of others, a

remedy for grief - - - - - - 332

53. The folly and misery of a spendthrift - - 338

54. A death-bed the true school of wisdom. The ef-

fects of death upon the survivors - - - 344-

55. The gay widow's impatience of the growth of her

daughter. The history of miss May-pole - 351

56. The necessity of complaisance. The Rambler's

grief for offending his correspondents - - 357 ·

57. Sententious rules of frugality - - - - 364:

58. The desire of wealth moderated by philosophy - 370

59. An account of Suspirius, the human screech-owl 376

60. The dignity and usefulness of biography - - 381

61. Å Londoner's

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Numb. 1. TUESDAY, March 20, 1749-50.

Cur tamen hoc libeat potius decurrere campo,
Per quem magnus equos Auruncæ flexit alumnus,
Si vacat, et placidi rationem admittitis, edam.

Juv,

Why to expatiate in this beaten field,
Why arms, oft us’d in vain, I mean to wield;
If time permit, and candour will attend,
Some satisfaction this essay may lend. ELPHINSTON.

D H E difficulty of the first address on any new

1 occasion, is felt by every man in his transactions with the world, and confessed by the settled and regular forms of salutation which necessity has introduced into all languages. Judgment was wearied with the per'plexity of being forced upon choice, where there was no motive to preference; and it was found convenient that some easy method of introduction should be established, which, if it wanted the allurement of novelty, might enjoy the security of prescription, · VOL. IV,

B

Perhaps Perhaps few authors have presented themselves before the publick, without wishing that such ceremonial modes of entrance had been anciently established, as might have freed them from those dangers which the desire of pleasing is certain to produce, and precluded the vain expedients of softening censure by apologies, or rousing attention by abruptness.

The epick writers have found the proemial part of the poem such an addition to their undertaking, that they have almost unanimously adopted the first lines of Homer, and the reader needs only be informed of the subject, to know in what manner the poem will begin.

But this solemn repetition is hitherto the peculiar distinction of heroick poetry; it has never been legally extended to the lower orders of literature, but seems to be considered as an hereditary privilege, to be enjoyed only by those who claim it from their alliance to the genius of Homer.

The rules which the injudicious use of this prerogative suggested to Horace, may indeed be applied to the direction of candidates for inferior fame; it may be proper for all to remember, that they ought not to raise expectation which it is not in their power to satisfy, and that it is more pleasing to see smoke brightening into flame, than flame sinking into smoke.

This precept has been long received, both from regard to the authority of Horace, and its conform mity to the general opinion of the world; yet there have been always some, that thought it no deviation from modesty to recommend their own labours,

and

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