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Paradise, whose name appears on page 129, is with her husband, John Paradise, Esq., frequently mentioned in Boswell, and in Fanny Burney's (and Madam D’Arblay's) series of diaries. She is still remembered in the local tradition of Williamsburg, Va., as “Madam Paradise," and the dining table, at which Johnson and other eminent friends of her husband often sat, is preserved.

The will of Henry Lee (page 135), dated 1746, is one of the earliest notices of the Warm Springs, in Frederick, now Berkeley county. William Aylett, father of the wife of Thomas Ludwell Lee (pages 170, 172), was not, “probably, of Prince William county.” He was of Westmoreland county; and though no published account identifies him, the Westinoreland Records show clearly who he was. There is on record a marriage settlement between William Aylett, Jr., son of William Aylett, of King William county, Gent., and Miss Ann, daughter of Henry Ashton, of Westmoreland, Gent., by which Henry Ashton gives, as a portion, the land where he lives (1,000 acres), called Nominy Flats, 1,004 acres in the forks of Nominy, 15 slaves, 40 cattle, and 40 hogs, and also promises to leave his daughter 5 other negroes. The deed is dated in 1724 or 1725, and states that the marriage had taken place. The will of William Aylett was dated March 29, and proved in Westmoreland, August 28, 1744; his legatees are his daughters, Elizabeth and Anne, the issue of his first marriage with Elizabeth, daughter of Colonel Henry Ashton; and Aune [sic] and Mary, his daughters by his present wife, Elizabeth. Refers to his father, William Aylett, of King William, deceased, and to the fact that he William, Jr.) was heir to his brother, John Aylett, and the said John's children, all also deceased; and makes certain reversionary bequests to his brothers, Philip and Benjamin Aylett. William Aylett was a member of the House of Burgesses from Westmoreland in 1736. His daughters, Elizabeth, married William Booth; Anne (the elder), married Augustine Washington; Anne (the younger, born 1738), married Richard Henry Lee, and Mary married Thomas Ludwell Lee.

In addition to his main work of tracing the history of the Lees, the author has given brief, but carefully prepared, notices of the families of Allerton, Armistead, Ashton, Aylett, Bedinger, Beverley, Bland, Bolling, Carroll, Carter, Chambers, Corbin, Custis, Fairfax, Fitzhugh, Gardner, Grymes, Hanson, Jenings, Jones, Ludwell, Marshall, Mason, Page, Randolph, Shepherd, Shippen, Tabb, Taylor, Turberville, Washington, and others of note. These contain a collection of data, in compact, intelligible form, for which the genealogical investigator, if forced to look for elsewhere, would have to make a very wide and comprehensive search. They add much to the value of the book.

“Lee of Virginia," is a large, beautifully printed volume of 586 pages, and is handsomely illustrated with thirty portraits, including the emigrant, and members of almost every successive generation; twenty engravings of coats of arms of Virginia and Maryland families, all derived from authentic sources, and various other illustrations of interest.

The book is a worthy memorial to a most distinguished family, and one that not only its members, but all who take an interest in men who have done so much good service to their country, will feel a pride in.

THE LOWER NORFOLK COUNTY VIRGINIA ANTIQUARY. No. I, Parts

I, II, III, IV. Edited by Edward W. James, Richmond, Va.

The first volume of the Antiquary is completed with the publication of part IV, which has appended a full index to the four parts. The promise of unusual excellence indicated by Part I, has been amply fulfilled, the whole number exhibiting the remarkable taste and discrimination which distinguish that Part as well as Mr. James' contributions to the l'irginia Magazine of History and Biography, and the William and Mary Historical Quarterly.

We hardly know where else there is to be found in the compass represented by the Antiquary, as so far published, so much matter of the highest importance, throwing light on the condition of Virginia in the Colonial age, and this matter is marked by great variety. An enumeration of some of the leading articles will show this: “The Land and Slave owners, Princess Anne county, 1771, 1772, 1773, 1774;" " Election of Vestrymen, Norfolk county, 1761;” “The Norfolk Academy;" “ Newton-Washington Letters;" Princess Ann County Committee of Safety, 1775;" “ James Silk Buckingham;'' Witchcraft in Virginia;" “Vestrymen of Elizabeth River Parish;" Processioners of Land, Princess Anne County, 1779;" “ The Church in Lower Norfolk County;"' “Going to Church Armed;” “Lower Norfolk County Libraries;" Public School in Princess Anne County, in 1736;"? Peyton Randolph."

The work which Mr. James is doing in the publication of this valuable periodical, entitles him to the grateful appreciation of every person who is interested in the history of Virginia. We predict that it will give his name a high degree of honor and distinction among all who in the future will direct their attention to the conditions prevailing in Colonial times. The Antiquary presents a great mass of information, which otherwise would be, for all practical purposes, inaccessible to the general run of students. We sincerely hope that this meritorious magazine will expand into many volumes, and that its careful and discriminating editor has many years before him for the continuation of his useful, instructive and interesting labors.

THE LIFE OF CHARLES CARROLL, OF CARROLLTON, by the author of the Life of George Mason, will be published by the Putnams, of New York, in a limited edition of 750 copies, within the coming year. It will be in two volumes, octavo, of a smaller size than the Mason, and will contain many of Carroll's letters, covering the period of his long life of over ninety years; also his journal, written in 1776, while a Commissioner from Congress to Canada, and the famous political essays, “Letters of the First Citizen," written in 1773.

MECKLENBURG DECLARATION. Owing to lack of space, the very able and interesting discussion of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence, which has been going on in our pages for several numbers, is discontinued. It is probable that a further contribution to the subject will be made by Dr. Graham in some other periodical in reply to the last paper by Mr. Henry published by us.

GENERAL INDEX.

NOTE.—This index does not include the long lists of names in “Slave
Owners of Spotsylvania County,” 1783, page 292, “Shareholders in
London Company," page 299, “ House of Burgesses, 1766–75,"page 380.

Abbett, 82.

| Archer, II, 80, 212, 300, 344, 434,
Abbott, 75.

438, 439 et seq.
Abernathy, 274.

Argall, 28, 29, 300 et seq, 345.
Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents, Ariss, 451 et seq.
75, 200, 313, 421.

Arlington, 119 et seq.
Abyron, 83.

Armwood, 75.
Accomac county, 148, 185, 189, 252, Armistead, 4, 173, 212, 441, 448, 474.
253, 316, 317.

Army Supplies in Revolution, 387,
Ackerman, 75.

400.
Acrill, 323, 326.

Arnall, 2.
Adam and Eve, ship, 127.

Arnold, 104.
Adams, 24, 108, 155, 323, 325, 326, Ascumb, 426.
445 et seq, 448 et seq.

Ashe, 225, 338.
Addison, 318.

Ashton, 474.
Adkins, 104.

Ashley, 104.
Africa, ship, 401.

Ashman, 104.
Agas, 318.

Asten, 454.
Aldredge, 424.

Atkinson, 104, 202, 274, 446.
Alexander, 104, III, 112, 428. Attack by Dutch on Virginia Fleet
Allan, 104.

in Hampton Roads in 1667,
Allen, 37, 110, 167, 172, 3:9, 324, 229, 245.

Atwell, 202.
450.
Allcock, 104.

Auditor, 43.
Allerton, 451, 474.

Aunt, 314.
Allsup, 104.

Austin, 99.
Ambler, 93, 357, 447.

Avery, 111, 222, 274, 277.
Amelia county, 89, 372,

Avirell, 106.
Anderson, 104, 161, 169, 187, 212, Aylett, 468, 474.
253, 278, 438 et seq.

Aytoun, 4.
Andrews, 3, 190, 315, 402 et seq.
Annesley, 135.

Baber, 314.
Anniseed, 28.

Bacon, 5, 96, 117-154, 245; Rebel-
Anthony, 300.

lion, 117-154; Castle, 91, 325.
Apperson, 104.

Bailey, 171.
Appomattox, 12, 37.

Baird, 274, 456.
A Plain and Friendly Perswasive Baggett, 104.

to the Inhabitants of Virginia Bagwell, 189.
and Maryland for Promoting Bagnall, 81.

Towns and Cohabitation, 255. Bagby, 358.
Arbogast, 412.

Baker, 81, 167-8, 201, 350 et saq.
Arbuckle, 413.

| Baldwin, 470.
Arbuthnot, 363.

Ballance, 107, 108.

Band, 97

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Ballard, 105, 350 et seq, 360. | Biswell, 204.
Ballagh, 218.

Bisley, 425.
Ball, iv.

Berkeley, 8 et seq, 9, II, 22, 119 et
Banister, 88, 162, 274, 331.

seq, 163, 245, 364 et seq, 365,

375. 408, 471.
Banks, 159 et seg, 314.

| Bermuda, 344; Hundred, 28, 29, 80,
Barnes, 160.

345.
Barbadoes, 253, 266.

Bertrand, 67, 176, 432.
Bargean, 300.

Berry, 154, 409,
Barbor, 300.

Bernley, 161, et sèq.
Barton, 462.

Berrien, 100.
Barrett, 109.

Berblock, 300.
Barnaby, 403.

Bernard, 162, 204, 207, 433.
Barksdale, 93.

Betty, 78.
Bartwith, 85.

Beverley, 4, 36 et seq, 62, 103, 174,
Barloe, 85.

198, 474.
Barrett, 174.

Blayton, II, 12.
Barraud, 432 et seq.

Bland, 151 et seq, 161 t seg, 163,
Barker, 315-6, 429.

174, 245, 273, 277, 279, 280, 330,
Barren, 76.

450, 474.
Barnett, 77

Blair, 161 et seq, 168, 170, 172, 174,
Bartlet, 104-5.

276 et seq, 364 et seq.
Bard, 76.

Blackford, v.
Barnes, 147

Blakiston, 17, 19, 21, 23, 385.
Bassett, 161 et seq, 174, 349 et seg, Blake, 199, 423.
364 et seq.

Blakey, 105.
Basse, 439, 469 et seq.

Blackwater, 42.
Basley, 401,

Blanton, 105.
Battaley, 104, 198-9.

Blackhall, 299.
Battaile, 209.

Blacksly, 426.
Batte, 75, 274, 277, 279.

Bladen, 109.
Baron, 3.

Blavdes, 104.
Baxter, 4, 5, 6, 7, 13.

Blackburn, 98, 446.
Bayley, 2, 3, 77.

Blathwayt, 15, 16, 19, 43 et seq, 416.
Bavwell, 78.

Black, 277, 288.
Bavlor, 164, 350 et seq, 358, 363, 441. Blackamore, 120, 173.
Bearcroft, 76.

Blandford, 281, 466.
Beale, 463.

Bledsoe, 105.
Beasley, 105.

Bleighton, 279.
Bedinger, 474.

Blewitt, 424.
Bedriman, 402.

Blizzard, 279.
Bedford, 363.

Blodget, 280.
Bell, 105, 202.

Blunt Point River, 24, 154.
Bells, 189.

Bohun, 345.
Benskin, 88.

Boisseau, 274.
Bennett, 81, 245, 313, 423, 454, 470 Bolton, 314.
et seg, 473.

Bolling, 89, 92, 96, 161, 274, 445,
Bengey, 104.

474.
Benson, 104.

Bon Accord, 445.
Benjamin, 412:

Bonner, 274.
Benger, 198.

Bond, 60.
Bevens, 333

Boods, 201.

Booker, 171.
Bickley, 159;
Bills of Exchange, 266.

Booth, 38, 249, 357, 451, 474.
Bird, 122.

Bordley, 366.
Birchett, 274.

Bostwick, 332.
Biss, 12, 13.

Boulware, 91.

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