The Literary Gazette: A Weekly Journal of Literature, Science, and the Fine Arts, Volume 10

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William Jerdan, William Ring Workman, John Morley, Frederick Arnold, Charles Wycliffe Goodwin
H. Colburn, 1826
 

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John Nixon, another amateur of the Momus school, created funny features with his crayon, and marie living faces laugh. Paul Sandby could ably quiz bis

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Page 227 - And the times of this ignorance God winked at; but now commandeth all men every where to repent: because he hath appointed a day, in the which he will judge the world in righteousness by that man whom he hath ordained; whereof he hath given assurance unto all men, in that he hath raised him from the dead.
Page 51 - The sexes roost apart, but at no great distance, so that, when the female utters a call, every male within hearing responds, rolling note after note, in the most rapid succession ; not as when spreading the tail and strutting near the hen, but in a voice resembling that of the tame turkey, when he hears any unusual or frequently repeated noise. Where the turkeys are numerous, the woods, from...
Page 51 - ... they are then least valuable. When the turkeys have arrived in their land of abundance, they disperse in small flocks, composed of individuals of all sexes and ages intermingled, who devour all the mast as they advance : this occurs about the middle of November.
Page 63 - Agree with thine adversary quickly, whiles thou art in the way with him ; lest at any time the adversary deliver thee to the judge, and the judge deliver thee to the officer, and thou be cast into prison. Verily I say unto thee, Thou shalt by no means come out thence, till thou hast paid the uttermost farthing.
Page 225 - ... on horse-back; and after dismounting and prostrating themselves before him, they took their places on the ground in front, but with their backs to the royal person, which is the custom of the country. He was seated in a sort of cage of cane or wood, near the door of his garden, on a seat which at the distance appeared to be covered with silk or satin, and through the railing looked upon the assembly before him, who formed a sort of semicircle extending from his seat to nearly where we were waiting.
Page 52 - Paumaron with a Scotch gentleman, by name Tarbet. We hung our hammocks in the thatched loft of a planter's house. Next morning I heard this gentleman muttering in his hammock, and now and then letting fall an imprecation or two, just about the time he ought to have been saying his morning prayers. ' What is the matter, sir ? ' said I, softly ; ' is anything amiss ? ' ' What's the matter ? ' answered he, surlily; 'why, the vampires have been sucking me to death.
Page 30 - In the Trans-Mississippian territories of the United States, the Burrowing Owl resides exclusively in the villages of the Marmot or Prairie Dog, whose excavations are so commodious as to render it unnecessary that our bird should dig for himself, as he is said to do in other parts of the world, where no burrowing animals exist. These villages are very numerous and variable in their extent, sometimes covering only a few acres, and at others spreading over the surface of the country for miles together....
Page 30 - ... settle down again at a short distance. If further disturbed, their flight is continued until they are no longer in view, or they descend into their dwellings, whence they are difficult to dislodge.
Page 158 - Lord Byron has written in the margin " It would have pained me more that the proprietor should often have wished to make alterations, than it would give me pleasure that the rest of Arezzo rose against his right (for right he had:) the depreciation of the lowest of mankind is more painful, than the applause of the highest is pleasing. The sting of the scorpion is more in torture than the possession of any thing short of Venus would be in rapture.

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