The History of Greece, Volume 3

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T. Cadell, 1822
 

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Page 397 - Anon they move In perfect phalanx to the Dorian mood Of flutes and soft recorders...
Page 231 - CEniadse, and thence to their several homes ; and soon after they concluded a treaty of alliance offensive and defensive for a hundred years with the Ambraciots, including in it the Amphilochians ; with a condition, judiciously added, that neither the Ambraciots should be bound to act offensively with the Acarnanians against the Peloponnesians, nor the Acarnanians with the Ambraciots against the Athenians: and the...
Page 397 - With solemn touches troubled thoughts, and chase Anguish, and doubt, and fear, and sorrow, and pain, From mortal or immortal minds.
Page 195 - Lacedemonian commissioners, according to the instructions received from Sparta, resolved that the sentence should rest upon the answer, that could be given and supported, to the simple question which was at first proposed. The Plataeans were, therefore called on, one by one, to say, Whether, in the present war, they had done any service to the Lacedaemonians, or their allies ? All answering in the negative, they were severally led aside, and immediately put to death.
Page 194 - The property of foreigners might be any where seized, and themselves reduced to slavery, or even put to death, without the breach of any human law ; and not only without the breach of any divine law, but prayers were addressed to the gods for favour and assistance in the commission of such violences.
Page 396 - Hell's concave, and, beyond Frighted the reign of Chaos and old Night. All in a moment through the gloom were seen Ten thousand banners rise into the air With orient colours waving : with them rose A forest huge of spears ; and thronging helms Appear'd, and serried shields in thick array Of depth immeasurable...
Page 194 - ... breach of any human law ; and not only without the breach of any divine law, but prayers were addressed to the gods for favour and assistance in the commission of such violences. Those connected with them by political or social compact the Greeks described by a term peculiar to themselves, ENSPONDI ; meaning, originally, persons with whom they had poured wine to the gods, or with whom they had made a compact, sanctified by the ceremony of pouring wine to the gods : those who were bound to them...
Page 127 - ... has been, in a great degree, due to others acting under them, whose very names have perished. The philosophy of Pericles taught him not to be vain-glorious, but to rest his fame upon essentially great and good rather than upon brilliant actions. It is observed by Plutarch that...
Page 298 - Lacedaemon in his neighborhood; but their interests were otherwise different, and their views, in some points, opposite. The principal object of Perdiccas was to subdue the province called Lyncus, or Lyncestis, among the mountains on the western frontier of Macedonia, and far from the Grecian colonies. This was a measure by no means calculated to promote the interest of Lacedaemon ; which rather required that alliances should be extended on all sides, and that the confederacy should have no enemy...
Page 5 - Axiochus; for her celebrity has preserved her father's name. With uncommon beauty were joined in Aspasia still more uncommon talents ; and, with a mind the most cultivated, manners so decent, that, in her more advanced years, not only Socrates professed to have learned eloquence from her, but, as Plutarch relates, the ladies of Athens used to accompany their husbands to her house for the instruction of her conversation. Pericles became her passionate admirer, and she attached herself to him during...

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