Mythology: The Age of Fable, The Age of Chivalry, Legends of Charlemagne

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T. Y. Crowell Company, 1913 - 2 pages
 

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Havnt trued it yeto
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Really well-written and easy to understand!

Contents

I
1
II
12
III
19
IV
28
V
38
VI
46
VII
52
VIII
62
LVIII
467
LIX
472
LX
475
LXI
479
LXII
486
LXIII
491
LXIV
497
LXV
507

IX
69
X
76
XI
80
XII
91
XIII
98
XIV
107
XV
115
XVI
122
XVII
129
XVIII
138
XIX
143
XX
150
XXII
160
XXIII
166
XXIV
177
XXV
185
XXVI
194
XXVII
204
XXVIII
211
XXIX
227
XXX
236
XXXI
247
XXXII
258
XXXIII
266
XXXIV
276
XXXV
288
XXXVI
300
XXXVII
310
XXXVIII
318
XXXIX
328
XL
337
XLI
343
XLII
358
XLIII
367
XLV
378
XLVI
389
XLVII
394
XLVIII
405
XLIX
414
L
418
LI
424
LII
435
LIII
441
LIV
445
LV
449
LVI
457
LVII
464
LXVI
515
LXVII
527
LXVIII
529
LXIX
534
LXX
539
LXXI
546
LXXII
553
LXXIII
564
LXXIV
572
LXXV
583
LXXVI
589
LXXVII
597
LXXVIII
608
LXXIX
620
LXXX
626
LXXXI
635
LXXXIII
637
LXXXIV
641
LXXXV
643
LXXXVI
647
LXXXVII
656
LXXXVIII
664
LXXXIX
672
XC
683
XCI
693
XCII
702
XCIII
712
XCIV
721
XCV
732
XCVI
739
XCVII
745
XCVIII
753
XCIX
760
C
769
CI
777
CII
788
CIII
801
CIV
814
CV
819
CVI
825
CVII
832
CVIII
842
CIX
848
CX
856
CXI
863
Copyright

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Page 179 - Castalian spring, might with this Paradise Of Eden strive ; nor that Nyseian isle Girt with the river Triton, where old Cham, Whom Gentiles Ammon call and Libyan Jove, Hid Amalthea, and her florid son Young Bacchus, from his stepdame Rhea's eye ; Nor where Abassin kings their issue guard, Mount Amara, though this by some supposed True Paradise, under the Ethiop line By Nilus...
Page 120 - But hail! thou Goddess sage and holy! Hail, divinest Melancholy! Whose saintly visage is too bright To hit the sense of human sight, And therefore to our weaker view O'erlaid with black, staid Wisdom's hue; Black, but such as in esteem Prince Memnon's sister might beseem, Or that starred Ethiop queen that strove To set her beauty's praise above The Sea-Nymphs, and their powers offended.
Page 299 - The oracles are dumb, No voice or hideous hum Runs through the arched roof in words deceiving. Apollo from his shrine Can no more divine, With hollow shriek the steep of Delphos leaving. No nightly trance or breathed spell Inspires the pale-eyed priest from the prophetic cell.
Page 57 - Not that fair field Of Enna, where Proserpine gathering flowers, Herself a fairer flower by gloomy Dis Was gathered, which cost Ceres all that pain To seek her through the world...
Page 165 - Coasting the Tyrrhene shore, as the winds listed, On Circe's island fell. (Who knows not Circe, The daughter of the Sun, whose charmed cup Whoever tasted lost his upright shape, And downward fell into a grovelling swine...
Page 38 - I DID but prompt the age to quit their clogs By the known rules of ancient liberty, When straight a barbarous noise environs me Of owls and cuckoos, asses, apes, and dogs...
Page 111 - Now sleeps the crimson petal, now the white ; Nor waves the cypress in the palace walk ; Nor winks the gold fin in the porphyry font : The fire-fly wakens : waken thou with me. Now droops the milkwhite peacock like a ghost, And like a ghost she glimmers on to me. Now lies the Earth all Danae to the stars, And all thy heart lies open unto me.
Page 20 - Or view the Lord of the unerring bow, The God of life, and poesy, and light The Sun in human limbs array'd, and brow All radiant from his triumph in the fight, The shaft hath just been shot the arrow bright With an immortal's vengeance ; in his eye And nostril beautiful disdain, and might And majesty, flash their full lightnings by, Developing in that one glance the Deity.
Page 291 - Ring out, ye crystal spheres, Once bless our human ears (If ye have power to touch our senses so), And let your silver chime Move in melodious time, And let the base of Heaven's deep organ blow; And with your ninefold harmony Make up full consort to the angelic symphony.
Page 137 - Fillet of a fenny snake, In the cauldron boil and bake; Eye of newt and toe of frog, Wool of bat and tongue of dog...

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