The English Reader: Or, Pieces in Prose and Verse, from the Best Writers ... with a Few Preliminary Observations on the Principles of Good Reading

Front Cover
Benjamin Olds, 1830 - 249 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 115 - to kick against the pricks. And I said, who art thou Lord ? And he replied, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest. 3 Why should it be thought a thing incredible with you that God should raise the dead ? I verily thought with my self, that I ought to do many things contrary to
Page 166 - in what least we dread; Frowns in the storm with angry brow, But in the sunshine strikes the blow. Epitaph. How lov'd, how valu'd once, avails thee not: To whom related, or by whom begot: A heap of dust alone remains of thee; 'Tis all thou art, and all the proud shall be. And
Page 211 - Morning Hymn. THESE are thy glorious works, parent of good, Almighty, thine this universal frame, Thus wond'rous fair; thyself how wond'rous then t Unspeakable, who sitt'st above these heavens. To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lower works ; yet these declare . Thy goodness beyond thought, and pow'r divine,
Page 217 - nightly, to thelist'ning earth, Repeats the story of her birth; Whilst all the stars that round her burn, And all the planets in their turn, Confirm the tidings as they roll, 3 What though, in solemn silence, all Move round the dark terrestrial ball! What tho' no real voice nor sound, Amid their radiant orbs be found!
Page 223 - 4 Lo, the poor Indian! whose untutor'd mind Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind; His soul proud science never taught to stray Far as the Solar Walk or Milky Way, Hope springs eternal in the human breast: Man never is, bat always to be
Page 211 - morn With thy bright circlet, praise him in thy sphere, While day arises, that sweet hour of prime. Thou sun, of this great world, both eye and soul, Acknowledge him thy greater, sound his praise In thy eternal course, both when thou climb'st, And when high noon hast gain'd, and when thou fall's!
Page 116 - 1 would to God, that not only thou, but also all that hear me this day, were both almost, and altogether, such as I am, except these bonds."* acts xxvi. SECTION IV. Lord Mansfield's Speech in the House of Peers, 1770, on the Bill for preventing the delays of Justice, by claiming the Privilege of Parliament. MY LORDS, WHEN
Page 216 - makes what happiness we justly call, Subsist not in the good of one, but all.—pope. SECTION. IV. The Goodness of Providence. THE Lord my pasture shall prepare, And feed me with a shepherd's care ; His presence shall my wants supply, And guard me with a watchful eye; My noon-day walks he shall attend, \ And all my midnight hours defend. t
Page 208 - 0 how shall words with equal warmth, The gratitude declare, That glows within my ravish'd heart But thou canst read it there. 3 Thy providence my life sustain'd, And all my wants redrest, When in the silent womb I lay, And huug upon the breast. 4 To all my weak complaints and cries, , Thy mercy
Page 217 - O Lord, art with me still; Thy friendly crook shall give me aid, And guide me through the dreadful shade. . 4 Tho' in a bare and rugged way, Through devious lonely wilds I stray, The barren wilderness shall smile, Thy bounty shall my pains beguile;

Bibliographic information