Introduction to Ethics

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1900 - 346 pages
 

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Page 122 - But if thy brother be grieved with thy meat, now walkest thou not charitably. Destroy not him with thy meat for whom Christ died."* " Let us therefore follow after the things which make for peace, and things wherewith one may edify another.
Page 291 - The days of our age are threescore years and ten ; and though men be so strong that they come to fourscore years, yet is their strength then but labour and sorrow ; so soon passeth it away, and we are gone.
Page 50 - Knowledge then seems to me to be nothing but the perception of the connection and agreement, or disagreement and repugnancy, of any of our ideas.
Page 299 - Past, But the hopes of youth fall thick in the blast And the days are dark and dreary. Be still, sad heart ! and cease repining ; Behind the clouds is the sun still shining ; Thy fate is the common fate of all, Into each life some rain must fall, Some days must be dark and dreary.
Page 170 - Few human creatures would consent to be changed into any of the lower animals for a promise of the fullest allowance of a beast's pleasures; no intelligent human being would consent to be a fool, no instructed person would be an ignoramus, no person of feeling and conscience would be selfish and base, even though they should be persuaded that the fool, the dunce, or the rascal is better satisfied with his lot than they are with theirs.
Page 170 - It is better to be a human being dissatisfied than a pig satisfied; better to be Socrates dissatisfied than a fool satisfied.
Page 142 - NOTHING can possibly be conceived in the world, or even out of it, which can be called good without qualification, except a Good Will.
Page 303 - Tired with all these, for restful death I cry As, to behold desert a beggar born, And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity...
Page 295 - And though it sometimes seem of its own might Like to an eye of gold to be fix'd there, And firm to hover in that empty height, That only is because it is so light But in that pomp it doth not long appear ; For when 'tis most admired, in a thought, Because it erst was nought, it turns to nought.
Page 97 - And he said, I heard thy voice in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked; and I hid myself.

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