Life and Letters of Thomas Campbell, Volume 2

Front Cover
Harper & brothers, 1855
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 493 - So live, that when thy summons comes, to join The innumerable caravan, that moves To that mysterious realm, where each shall take His chamber in the silent halls of death, Thou go not, like the quarry slave at night, Scourged to his dungeon; but, sustained and soothed By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.
Page 319 - Sent forth a sleepy horror through the blood ; And where this valley winded out, below, The murmuring main was heard, and scarcely heard, to flow.
Page 462 - The eclipse of nature spreads my pall— The majesty of darkness shall Receive my parting ghost ! "This spirit shall return to Him That gave its heavenly spark ; Yet think not, Sun, it shall be dim, When thou thyself art dark ; No ! it shall live again, and shine In bliss unknown to beams of thine, By Him recall'd to breath, Who captive led captivity, Who robb'd the grave of victory, And took the sting from death.
Page 494 - Can I forget the dismal night that gave My soul's best part for ever to the grave? How silent did his old companions tread, By midnight lamps, the mansions of the dead, Through breathing statues, then unheeded things, Through rows of warriors, and through walks of kings! What awe did the slow solemn knell inspire; The pealing organ, and the pausing choir; The duties by the lawn-robed prelate paid : And the last words that dust to dust conveyed!
Page 493 - So live, that when thy summons comes to join The innumerable caravan that moves To the pale realms of shade, where each shall take His chamber in the silent halls of death, Thou go not, like the quarry-slave at night, Scourged to his dungeon, but, sustained and soothed By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.
Page 170 - But the day-star attracted his eye's sad devotion, For it rose o'er his own native isle of the ocean, Where once, in the fire of his youthful emotion, He sang the bold anthem of Erin go bragh. Sad is my fate...
Page 494 - For though in dreadful whirls we hung High on the broken wave, I knew thou wert not slow to hear, Nor impotent to save.
Page 40 - I could have compass'd sea and land To do her bidding. Lady. Is she young or old? Page. Neither, if right I guess ; but she is fair : For time hath laid his hand so gently on her, As he too had been aw'd.
Page 381 - United States, your banner wears, Two emblems, — one of fame, Alas, the other that it bears Reminds us of your shame ! The white man's liberty in types Stands blazoned by your stars ; But what's the meaning of your stripes ? They mean your Negro-scars.
Page 73 - But years more gloomy follow'd, and no more The assembled people dared in face of day To worship God, or even at the dead Of night, save when the wintry storm raved fierce, And thunder-peals...

Bibliographic information