The History and Poetry of the Scottish Border: Their Main Features and Relations

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J. Maclehose, 1878 - 556 pages
 

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Page 401 - Of a' the airts the wind can blaw I dearly like the West, For there the bonnie lassie lives, The lassie I lo'e best : There wild woods grow, and rivers row, And mony a hill between ; But day and night my fancy's flight Is ever wi' my Jean. I see her in the dewy flowers, I see her sweet and fair : I hear her in the tunefu' birds, I hear her charm the air : There's not a bonnie flower that springs By fountain, shaw, or green, There's not a bonnie bird that sings But minds me o
Page 462 - It was a barren scene, and wild, Where naked cliffs were rudely piled; But ever and anon between Lay velvet tufts of loveliest green; And well the lonely infant knew Recesses where the wall-flower grew, And honey-suckle loved to crawl Up the low crag and ruined wall.
Page 487 - And pastoral melancholy. That region left, the vale unfolds Rich groves of lofty stature, With Yarrow winding through the pomp Of cultivated nature; And, rising from those lofty groves, Behold a Ruin hoary ! The shattered front of Newark's Towers, Renowned in Border story.
Page 484 - Be Yarrow stream unseen, unknown, It must, or we shall rue it, We have a vision of our own, Ah! why should we undo it?
Page 444 - Scarba's isle, whose tortured shore Still rings to Corrievreken's roar, And lonely Colonsay ; Scenes sung by him who sings no more ! His bright and' brief career is o'er, And mute his tuneful strains ; Quenched is his lamp of varied lore That loved the light of song to pour ; A distant and a deadly shore Has LEYDEN'S cold remains ! XII.
Page 486 - Mild dawn of promise ! that excludes All profitless dejection ; Though not unwilling here to admit A pensive recollection. , Where was it that the famous Flower Of Yarrow Vale lay bleeding ? His bed perchance was yon smooth mound On which the herd is feeding: And haply from this crystal pool, Now peaceful as the morning, The Water-wraith ascended thrice And gave his doleful warning. Delicious is the Lay that sings The haunts of happy Lovers, The path that leads them to the grove, The leafy grove...
Page 438 - Thy braes were bonny, Yarrow stream, When first on them I met my lover; Thy braes how dreary, Yarrow stream, When now thy waves his body cover! For ever now, O Yarrow stream ! Thou art to me a stream of sorrow; For never on thy banks shall I Behold my Love, the flower of Yarrow. He promised me a milk-white steed To bear me to his father's bowers; He promised me a little page To squire me to his father's towers; He promised me a wedding-ring, The wedding-day was fix'd to-morrow; Now he is...
Page 351 - Tis time we were away.' The cock he hadna craw'd but once, And clapp'd his wings at a', When the youngest to the eldest said, ' Brother, we must awa. 'The cock doth craw, the day doth daw, The channerin' worm doth chide ; Gin we be mist out o' our place, A sair pain we maun bide.
Page 352 - Though thou art young and tender of age, I think thou art true to me. 'Come, tell me all that thou hast seen, And look thou tell me true! Since I from Smaylho'me tower have been, What did thy lady do?
Page 324 - There came a wind out of the north, A sharp wind and a snell ; And a deep sleep came over me, And frae my horse I fell.

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