Aldine Language Method: A Manual for Teachers Using the First Language Book. first book

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Contents

Playing a Story
28
Telling a Story
31
A Story to Finish
32
Finishing a Story
34
Stories to Tell
35
Making Stories from a Picture
37
Telling True Stories
43
Games of Description
44
Some Words Used after Than
45
Chapter Test
46
FORMING THE AMERICAN SPEECH CLUB READING TELLING AND DRAMATIZING STORIES LEARNING TO USE CAPITALS AND PERI...
47
Reading a Story
49
Just
51
Conversation and Dramatizing
52
Fly Flew Grow Grew Blow Blew
56
SECTION PAGE VI Telling a Story
57
Comparing Things
58
Telling True Stories
59
Sentences Capitals and Periods
61
Using Capitals and Periods
63
Preparing to Write from Dictation
65
Unstudied Dictation
67
Wh
68
Questions and the Question Mark
69
Writing Answers to Riddles
70
Telling True Stories
73
Studying a Poem
74
PartReading and Dramatizing
75
Learning to Tell a Story
76
Telling Stories
77
TELLING AND WRITING STORIES LEARNING TO MAKE AND WRITE TITLES STUDYING A POEM THE AMERICAN SPEECH CLUB AT ...
82
How Titles are Written
83
Writing from Dictation
84
Titles to Copy
86
Giving Titles to Pictures
87
For
89
Telling True Stories
91
Copying a Story
95
Studying a Poem
96
Making New Rhymes
97
Correcting the Mistake of Leaving off Last Letters
98
SECTION PAGE XVII Finding Words That End in ing
99
PLAYING GAMES LEARNING TO WRITE FROM DICTATION DRAMATIZING MAKING STORIES FROM PICTURES PRACTICE FOR THE A...
101
A Story to Study and Tell
102
Their and There
104
Writing a Story
106
Practice for the American Speech Club
109
Writing Words Ending in ed
110
The Game of Names
111
Writing Names
112
Writing from Dictation
113
Writing from Dictation
115
Reading and Studying a Story
117
Hide Hid etc
120
Making Stories from a Picture
121
Telling True Stories
122
Telling the Story in a Poem
123
Chapter Test
124
LEARNING TO SPEAK POLITELY TELLING HOW TO DO THINGS MEMORIZING A POEM LEARNING NEW WORDS AND THE USE OF Q...
126
Studying a Story
128
Using Give and Gave
129
Writing a Story
204
Studying a Fable
212
SECTION PAGE V Writing an Original Story
215
Telling True Stories
216
Reading and Studying a Story
217
Went Has Gone Have Gone Had Gone
218
Did Has Done Have Done Had Done
219
Turning a Dialogue into a Story
220
Writing a Story from a Dialogue
221
Studying a Poem
223
Learning to Speak Words Clearly
224
Reading a Poem
225
Chapter Test
226
LEARNING TO WRITE DATES AND ABBREVIATIONS AND TO USE MARKS OF PUNCTUATION WRITING A POLITE NOTE PRACTICE F...
228
A Lesson in Copying
229
Come Came etc
231
Writing Unstudied Dictation
232
The Months and their Abbreviations
234
Learning How Dates are Written
235
My Birthday
236
A Written Lesson in Politeness
238
How the Months were Named
239
Speak Clearly
240
Writing a Quotation from Memory
241
Making Stories from a Picture
242
A Review of Capitals and Punctuation Marks
243
Catch
244
Finishing a Story
245
WRITING STORIES FROM PICTURES AND POEMS TELLING AND WRITING RIGINAL FABLES AND TRUE STORIES LEARNING TO USE ...
246
Studying a Story
247
Dramatizing a Story
248
Telling a Story
249
Some Words and their Opposites
250
Studying and Copying a Fable
253
Get Bunch
254
Writing Original Fables
255
Dont Doesnt
256
A Contraction that is Always Wrong
257
Using the Exclamation Mark
258
Writing Exclamations
259
Making Stories from a Picture
260
Comparing Two Poems
263
Writing Stories from Poems
264
Chapter Test
265
LEARNING TO USE THE DICTION ARY WRITING LETTERS A PLAY FOR THE AMERICAN SPEECH CLUB SECTION PAGE I Making a Stor...
267
Writing a Story from an Outline
270
The Value of the Dictionary
273
The First Dictionary Lesson
274
Finding Words in the Dictionary
276
A Test for the American Speech Club
277
Telling a Story
278
Learning How Dates are Written
279
Writing Dates from Dictation
280
Preparing to Answer a Letter
283
Answering a Letter
284
Writing a Letter to a Friend
285
Practice for the American Speech Club
287
ADDITIONAL WORK
289
Books
294
INDEX
297
Copyright

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Page 262 - In winter I get up at night And dress by yellow candle-light. In summer quite the other way, I have to go to bed by day. I have to go to bed and see The birds still hopping on the tree, Or hear the grown-up people's feet Still going past me in the street. And does it not seem hard to you, When all the sky is clear and blue, And I should like so much to play, To have to go to bed by day?
Page 51 - We have a secret, just we three, The robin, and I, and the sweet cherry tree; The bird told the tree, and the tree told me, And nobody knows it but just we three.
Page 194 - Monday's child is fair of face/ Tuesday's child is full of grace/ Wednesday's child is full of woe/ Thursday's child has far to go/ Friday's child is loving and giving/ Saturday's child works hard for a living/ But the child that is born on the Sabbath Day/ Is bonny, and blithe, and good, and gay.
Page 176 - You are in the china closet!" He would cry, and laugh with glee — It wasn't the china closet; But he still had Two and Three. "You are up in papa's big bedroom, In the chest with the queer old key!
Page 157 - Whenever this chapter is completed, whether at the end of the third or at the beginning of the fourth year...
Page 229 - ... Mark; the Use of the Comma with Noun of Direct Address First read the story with the children. Let it be read so well that the children can readily understand what is meant when their book tells them (p. 204) that "an exclamation mark is placed after every sentence expressing sudden strong feeling." The story contains two new forms of punctuation that must stand as types to the pupils: (1) the use of commas to separate the name of the person ad203 dressed from the rest of the sentence ; (2) the...
Page 136 - To secure this perfect understanding, supplement, if necessary, the questions in the pupils' book with questions that will bring the most detailed and definite answers possible. Your questions, at first, must be as definite, as this : Is any one speaking? (Insist on the answer " yes " or "no.") Who is speaking? What does he say? Put your fingers around what he says. What do we call those words ? What marks are around them? Point to those marks and tell their name. What mark is used to separate the...
Page 51 - I and the sweet cherry tree ; The bird told the tree, and the tree told me, And nobody knows it but just we three. But of course the robin knows it best, Because he built the— I shan't tell the rest ; And laid the four little — somethings in it — I am afraid I shall tell it every minute.
Page 164 - I won't;" and the pig said, " I won't." "When she came back with the flour, she said, "Who will make this flour into bread?" The rat said, "I won't;" the cat said, "I won't;" and the pig said, " I won't." The little red hen said, " I will, then;" and she did. When the bread was done, the little red hen said, " Who will eat this bread ?" The rat said, "I will;" the cat said, "I will;" and the pig said, "I will.
Page 78 - Run begins with a capital letter because it is the first word in a sentence. Spell it, capital Run.

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