Proceedings of the Association for Promoting the Discovery of the Interior Parts of Africa

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 26 - I was anxiously looking around for the river, one of them called out, geo affili (see the water), and looking forwards, I saw with infinite pleasure the great object of my mission the long sought for majestic Niger, glittering to the morning sun, as broad as the Thames at Westminster, and flowing slowly to the eastward.
Page 29 - They lightened their labour by songs, one of which was composed extempore ; for I was myself the subject of it. It was sung by one of the young women, the rest joining in a sort of chorus. The air was sweet and plaintive, and the words, literally translated, were these : ' The winds roared, and the rains fell.
Page 29 - The air was sweet and plaintive, and the words literally translated were these : ' The winds roared, and the rains fell; the poor white man, faint and weary, came and sat under our tree ; he has no mother to briiig him milk, no wife to grind his corn.
Page 26 - ... (see the water), and looking forwards, I saw with infinite pleasure the great object of my mission the long sought for majestic Niger, glittering to the morning sun, as broad as the Thames at Westminster, and flowing slowly to the eastward. I hastened to the brink, and, having drank of the water, lifted up my fervent thanks in prayer to the Great Ruler of all things, for having thus far crowned my endeavours with success.
Page 32 - The kernel is enveloped in a sweet pulp, under a thin green rind ; and the butter produced from it, besides the advantage of its keeping the whole year without salt, is whiter, firmer, and, to my palate, of a richer flavour than the best butter I ever tasted made from cow's milk. The growth and preparation of this commodity, seem to be among the first objects of African industry in this and the neighbouring states; and it constitutes a main article of their inland commerce.
Page 32 - ... in water has somewhat the appearance of a Spanish olive. The kernel is enveloped in a sweet pulp, under a thin green rind ; and the butter produced from it, besides the advantage of its keeping the whole year without salt, is whiter, firmer, and, to my palate, of a richer flavour, than the best butter I ever tasted made from cow's milk.
Page 27 - The view of this extensive city; the numerous canoes upon the river; the crowded population, and the cultivated state of the surrounding country, formed altogether a prospect of civilization and magnificence, which I little expected to find in the bosom of Africa.
Page 12 - Jarra is of considerable extent: the houses are built of clay and stone intermixed ; the clay answering the purpose of mortar. It is situated in the Moorish kingdom of Ludamar ; but the major part of the inhabitants are Negroes, from the borders of the southern states, who prefer a precarious protection under the Moors, which they purchase by a tribute, rather than continue exposed to their predatory hostilities.
Page 52 - Negroes : for that physical geography gives rise to habits, which often determine national character, must be allowed by every person, who is a diligent observer of mankind. It must be acknowledged, that the absolute extent of Mr. Park's progress in Africa, compared with the amazing size of that continent, appears but small, although it be nearly i too British miles in a direct line, reckoned from its western extremity, Cape Verd.

Bibliographic information