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for he cannot adequately judge of their intensity from being told that these pleasures will constitute a 'fulness of joy, because he knows not what will be the measure of the vast capacity which that fulness is to occupy:

Once more: in the gratification of animal taste there are limits which cannot be exceeded. The faculty itself seems to reach its highest state, before the body arrives at its maturity. Even the child has as clear a discernment of different tastes, and as exquisite a relish of those which are agreeable, as one who has grown up to manhood. And there is also, in the imperfection and infirmity of man's condition in this life, an ultimate and impassable limit to those pleasures which result from the gratification of intellectual taste. But with spiritual taste it is entirely otherwise : this faculty, as well as others inherent in the spiritual man, grows with his growth, and strengthens with his strength. The aged saint, who has through a long series of years been feasting on spiritual things, and has thereby been nourished to an elevated stature in spiritual knowledge, will not hesitate to tell us that his relish for such things has ever been increasing in proportion to the frequency and the intensity of his enjoyment; and that in comparison with the enjoyment which they yield after the experience of so many years, the enjoyment which they yielded in his early years was nothing. And we are not without reason for supposing that, as eternity rolls onward, there will be still a constant progression, in virtue of which this faculty of taste will continue to expand, and to augment its capacity of being gratified, that capacity being ever met with a sufficiency of objects to occupy and fill it,

N. R.

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ORIGIN AND PROGRESS OF METHODISM IN SAVANNAH.

To the Editor of the Methodist Magazine and Quarterly Review.

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Dear BROTHER :- In the fourth volume of the Methodist Magazine will be found a sketch of the rise of Methodism in Savannak. For several years past this has been thought to be materially defective; and that there were too many important facts connected with the struggle to obtain a standing in this place to be lost in oblivion. Application was therefore made by the quarterly conference to the writer of the

Sketch' to state these facts more in detail. This, perhaps, he was better able to do than any other person now living, as he was a principal, agent through a great part of the conflict, and personally acquainted with a number of transactions now known to no one else. And as no writer had noticed the account of Mr. Wesley in Savannah, given in the History of Georgia, it seemed not entirely improper to take in this matter also. According to his ability and opportunity he has performed the task. It is offered to you for publication. He has no apology to make. You and the readers will pronounce on its merits and defects. Yours respectfully,

LEWIS MYERS. Goshen, Effingham co., Ga., Jan. 1833.

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The first shall be last will emphatically apply to Savannah, in regard to Methodism, the metropolis in one of the old thirteen states, visited by the distinguished founders of Methodism, and the last to embrace it. Why this should be so, is a question which will obtain a correct answer only when it appears before the bar of infinite Wisdom. Before we notice the transactions which took place in Savannah, it will be necessary to step over into England, and glance at a few circumstances connected with the embarkation of the Rev. Messrs. John and Charles Wesley for the state of Georgia, then a British colony. In the university of Oxford, their attention had been directed to the art of holy living and dying. They and their pious associates strictly kept the rules of the university and of the Church. They visited the poor, sick, and prisoners, and contributed their surplus income to their aid, with such pious instructions as their respective circumstances required. This drew upon them the title of METHODISTS, perhaps in allusion to some prior medical department in France. This term, then given incidentally and by way of reproach, soon became conspicuous, and, in time, permanent. Mr. J. Wesley, habituated to collegiate studies, had acquired a decided preference to a university life. His sentiments on this point had been tested. It is remarked, that the benevolent founders of the colony of Georgia may perhaps challenge the annals of any nation to produce a design more generous and praiseworthy than the one which they had undertaken.* They aimed at nothing less than the benefit of both settlers and natives, in time and eternity. They felt the need of a divine, corresponding with their high, humane, and pious views, to accompany, as a missionary, General Oglethorpe, the founder of the colony. Their attention was directed to Mr. Wesley. They applied to him. It was a trying moment. He paused. He consulted with his friends. He prayed to God. He caught the missionary fire, and yielded. Here appears the rise of the missionary spirit in modern times. His attention in this was directed to Georgia. But God, it seems, designed in this enterprise to give a polish to his university education, and so aid in preparing him to rouse a sleeping, and direct the attention of a waking world. His object was to preach the Gospel to the Indians. His brother Charles accompanied him as secretary to General Oglethorpe, and of Indian affairs. On 6th Feb., 1736, he first set foot on American ground. There he and his company kneeled down and gave thanks to God. So did Columbus when he first landed on the new world. • He threw himself upon his knees, kissed the earth, and returned thanks to God with tears of joy.' Thus the two Wesleys were the first English missionaries who stepped on Georgian ground. Some time after their arrival, a missionary house was built for their accommodation. Mr. J. Wesley had not been two days in Savannah, ere he received a catechetical lecture by a German minister on one of the most important doctrines of the Gospel. After being introduced by General Oglethorpe, Mr. Wesley desired that he would give him some advice as to the course he had best pursue. He replied, My brother, I must ask one or two questions. Have you the witness within yourself? Does the Spirit of God bear witness with

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* M'Call's History of Georgia.

know your

your spirit that you are a child of God ? • I was surprised,' remarks Mr. Wesley, “and knew not what to answer. His tutor saw it, and lowered his tone. “Do you know Jesus Christ? Do you self? This was a subject on which all Oxford, and nearly all England, was as still as midnight. Mr. Wesley had directed the bent of his mind in inquiring how the full liberty of the Gospel was to be obtained; but as yet there had appeared no one capable of taking him by the hand, and of conducting him right to the mercy seat. The pearl of great price had been reserved until his return to England.

He soon made efforts to pursue the objects of his mission, but found the Indians so involved in war and confusion, as to give very little encouragement of success. On Sunday the 7th of March he entered on his ministry in Savannah. So crowded was the church ; so attentive and serious the congregation, that his mind was raised to the highest summit of favorable expectation. The sequel will show how this was supported. In the mean

In the meantime his brother went to Frederica, where General Oglethorpe principally resided, and endeavored to take charge of the settlers there until he might see an opening to the heathens. But his success was by no means in proportion to his labors.

Though his brother had interviews with some chiefs among the Indians, he never found any opening to introduce the Gospel among them; he, therefore, continued his labors in Savannah, and occasionally at Frederica and other places. He plyed himself strictly to the welfare of his charge, adhering to the rules and order of the Church of England. He also prevailed on the most serious of his flock to unite, and form a small society, and to meet once or twice a week, in order to reprove, instruct, and exhort one another. He also selected out of these a smaller number for a more intimate union with each other, which might be forwarded by singly conversing with each, and at his own house together, every Sunday afternoon. Thus, in Savannah, was the origin of the future classes and bands. He also visited his flock from house to house, and spared no pains in promoting Christianity among them. If the parishioners at large did not receive the benefit he intended, it certainly was not for want of diligence on his part. He was fully employed, dividing his labor among them. His own words

are, • On the Lord's day the English service lasted from five to half past six. Italian (with a few Vaudois) began at nine. The second service for the English, including the sermon and the holy communion, continued from half past ten to about half past twelve. The French service began at one; at two I catechised the children. About three began the English service. After this was ended I joined with as many as my largest room would hold, in reading, prayer, and singing praise. About six the service of the Germans began, at which I was glad to be present, not as a teacher, but as a learner.' The reader will observe, that the first Sunday school in the English language, in Savannah, was established by Mr. Wesley. He also engaged in manual employment. Three hundred acres

· having been set apart at Savannah for glebe land, he took from it what he thought sufficient for a good garden, and here he frequently worked with his own hands.' (Moore's Life of Wesley.) I and my family (eight in number) did employ all our spare time there, (Georgia,) in

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felling of trees, and clearing of ground, as hard labor as any negro need be employed in.' (See his Journal.) What an example for Methodist preachers of modern times! How much better than to plunge into merchandise, and rise up bankrupts! • He continued his custom of eating little, sleeping less, and leaving not a moment of his time unemployed.' (Moore's Life of Wesley.) Moreover, he exposed himself with the utmost indifference to every change of season and inclemency of weather-hail, snow, storm, and tempest. He frequently lay on the ground, and his clothes and hair would freeze to the earth. He would wade up to his breast in waters, and swim over rivers with his clothes on, and travel till they were dry: and all this without any apparent injury to his health. Surely, He who numbers the hairs of our head was his guardian. “In his visits•to Frederica he met with great opposition and much illiberal abuse; in Savannah he

was, however, rapidly gaining influence, when a circumstance occurred which issued in his departure from Georgia altogether.'

And here the close of this part of the narrative would be hastened, had not a writer of the • History of Georgia' thought proper to ornament his book with such details in relation to this man of God, as he may have thought best to promote his views of Methodism. Before any extracts are introduced, it will be necessary to glance at his preface, where he says, without map or compass he entered an unexplored forest, destitute of any other guide than a few ragged pamphlets,

а defaced newspapers, and scraps of manuscripts. And, in his index, he professes to give an account of Mr. Wesley's conduct and character taken from his journal by his biographers. It should be noticed, also, that he lays a great claim to the lenity and indulgence of critics.' He begins by complimenting Mr. Wesley for accompanying General Oglethorpe with the intention of making religious impressions on the minds of the Indians' and colonists! and gives a picture of his abstemiousness, states his having been charged with improprieties in civil and sacred matters. Among other things, that he • attempted to establish confessions, penance, mortifications,' &c, and that he called these

apostolic constitutions'-all calculated to produce civil and religious tyranny.” Where is his authority for all this? Why, according to his own account, .ragged pamphlets and defaced newspapers ! • That his schemes seemed judiciously calculated to debase and depress the minds of the people, to break down the spirit of liberty, and humble them with fastings, penances, and drinking water,' &c. Could this have been a comment of his own, or did he gather it in an plored forest, without map or guide ?' • That Jesuitical arts were used to bring his schemes to perfection ; party divisions were made in private families ; spies engaged in their houses; servants bribed to communicate family secrets to him,' and especially females were required to discover to him their secret actions, and the subject of their dreams!!! This certainly must be one of the paragraphs for which he brings in his claim' before the critics' for their lenity and indulgence. The storm of persecution that broke out upon Mr. Wesley is next introduced. As we are giving an account of the rise of Methodism at the place where the transactions alleged against him are said to have transpired, the intelligent reader will indulge us if we should ap

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pear to him a little prolix. Our historian goes on, and says, Mr. Wesley •had preserved a great intimacy with Causton, the chief bailiff, and had said some tender things to his niece. SHE REJECTED HIS PROPOSALS, having been engaged to a gentleman whom she married soon after.' This he likely states on this lady's affidavit. On this case Mr. Wesley is silent in his Journals. Delicacy and self respect imposed it. Yet the correctness may, at least, be doubted. Ist. Because the action was brought against him on bills before mentioned, with which this case was connected, principally at the instance of Causton, the chief bailiff. (Wesley's Journal.) 2d. Said Causton was charged with having threatened jurors whose verdict did not correspond with his inclination and humor : of low origin:'~ intoxicated with the powers vested in him : proud, haughty, and cruel : that he compelled eight freeholders with an officer to attend at the door of the court house; who had orders to wrest their firelocks as soon as he appeared : that juries from terror of him could not act according to their conscience: that his head was turned by power and pride : and that he threatened, without distinction, rich and poor strangers and inhabitants who dared to oppose his arbitrary proceedings or claimed their just rights and privileges, with the stocks, jail, and whipping post. And that under his ministration looks were criminal, and the grand sin of opposing justice to authority was punished without mercy.' Also, that irons, whipping posts, gibbets, &c, were provided to keep the inhabitants in perpetual terror. Innocence afforded no protection. And to complete the climax, for some time there were more imprisonments, whipping, &c, of the white people, in this colony of liberty than in all British America beside. (Hugh M'Call's History of Georgia.) Who can make himself appear innocent in such hands ? And, if such a character could prepare and hand in a presentment of grievances for a grand jury to sign, which appears from Mr. Wesley's Journal that he did, who can even think that he used no influence in wording the affidavit of this lady according to his own notion ? 3d. It appears that in the afternoon of the same day, that the said presentment was handed in, this lady was examined, who acknowledged that she had no objections to make against Mr. Wesley before her marriage. The next day Mr. and Mrs. Causton were also examined, when she confessed that it was at her request Mr. Wesley had written to Mrs. Williamson on the 5th* of July, and Mr. Causton declared, that if Mr. Wesley had asked his consent to have married his niece, he should not have refused it.' (R. Watson's quotation from Whitehead's Life of Wesley.) And 4th, Mr. Moore in a note in Wesley's Life says, 'I know that she ultimately broke it off ; but I know also that he did not at any time determine on marriage. I had the whole account from himself; and I do not know that he ever told it to any other person.' He goes on to say, that thirteen indictments were found against Wesley, by fortyfour freeholders !! So writes the Georgia historian. This assertion needs some attention. Mr. Wesley, in his Journal, states that more than twenty of them were inimical to his person and profession. Also,

* There is a mistake in the date here. He wrote to Couston the 5th of July, and $0 Mr. Williamson on the 11th August, [See Wesley's Journal, 1st. rol, Americ gan edition.)

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