Two Treatises on Civil Government

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G. Routledge and sons, limited, 1887 - 320 pages

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Page 180 - Though the earth and all inferior creatures be common to all men, yet every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his.
Page 252 - This power to act according to discretion for the public good, without the prescription of the law and sometimes even against it...
Page 180 - For this labour being the unquestionable property of the labourer, no man but he can have a right to what that is once joined to, at least where there is enough, and as good left in common for others.
Page 146 - Wherefore she said unto Abraham, Cast out this bondwoman and her son: for the son of this bondwoman shall not be heir with my son, even with Isaac.
Page 86 - Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all things under his feet : All sheep and oxen, yea, and the beasts of the field ; The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passeth through the paths of the seas.
Page 148 - Let people serve thee, and nations bow down to thee : be lord over thy brethren, and let thy mother's sons bow down to thee : cursed be every one that curseth thee, and blessed be he that blesseth thee.
Page 148 - And the Lord said unto her, Two nations are in thy womb, and two manner of people shall be separated from thy bowels; and the one people shall be stronger than the other people; and the elder shall serve the younger.
Page 39 - ... for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil. Wherefore ye must needs be subject, not only for wrath, but also for conscience sake.
Page 240 - The supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own consent. For the preservation of property being the end of government, and that for which men enter into society, it necessarily supposes and requires that the people should have property...
Page 179 - I will not content myself to answer, that, if it be difficult to make out " property" upon a supposition that God gave the world to Adam and his posterity in common, it is impossible that any man but one universal monarch should have any

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