Hints on Ornamental Needlework as Applied to Ecclesiastical Purposes

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James Burns, Portman Street. Rugeley: J.T. Walters, 1843 - 58 pages

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Page 12 - And all the women that were wise-hearted did spin with their hands, and brought that which they had spun, both of blue, and of purple, and of scarlet, and of fine linen. And all the women whose heart stirred them up in wisdom spun goats
Page 2 - A TRACT UPON TOMBSTONES ; or, Suggestions for the consideration of Persons intending to set up that kind of Monument to the Memory of Deceased Friends. Demy 8vo., with numerous Illustrations. Second Edition, price Is., or Is. 2d. by post.
Page 53 - Their sound is gone out into all lands : and their words into the ends of the world. 5 In them hath he set a tabernacle for...
Page 3 - Is. 4d. each. Addressed to persons whose lot has been cast in the upper and middle ranks, in the hope it may be instrumental in prevailing on some to think on the responsibilities which rank, property, and education involve the duties of the higher classes to the lower. A TRACT UPON TOMBSTONES ; or, Suggestions for the consideration of Persons intending to set up that kind of Monument to the Memory of Deceased Friends. Demy 8vo., with numerous Illustrations. Second Edition, price Is., or Is.
Page 27 - Communion, we appoint that the same Tables shall from time to time be kept and repaired in sufficient and seemly manner, and covered in time of Divine Service with a carpet of silk or other decent stuff thought meet by the Ordinary of the place, if any question be made of it, and with a fair linen cloth at the time of the ministration as becometh that Table, and so stand, saving when the said holy Communion is to be administered.
Page 6 - King's present occasions) and profitably be recovered ; for private men's halls were hung with altar cloths, their tables and beds covered with copes instead of carpets and coverlets. Many drank at their daily meals in chalices, and no wonder if, in proportion, it came to the share of their horses to be watered in rich coffins of marble...
Page 37 - It is not unusual for modern artists to decry the ancient system of decorating churches with much painting ; but those who raise these objections seem to forget that what is technically termed keeping, is quite as requisite in a building as in a picture. The moment colour is introduced in the windows, the rest of the ornaments must correspond, the ceiling, the floor, all must bear their part in the general effect. A stained window in a white church is a mere spot, which, by its richness, serves...
Page 37 - ... the ceiling, the floor, all must bear their part in the general effect. A stained window in a white church is a mere spot, which, by its richness, serves only to exhibit in a more striking manner the poverty of the rest of the building. In the old churches, the azure and gilt ceiling, the encrusted tiles of various colours, the frescoes on the walls, the heraldic charges, the costly hangings of the altars, the variegated glass, all harmonized together, and formed a splendid whole, which can only...
Page 6 - It was a sorry house, and not worth the naming, which had not somewhat of this furniture in it, though it were only a fair large cushion, made of a cope, or...
Page 22 - ... needlework, the writer most justly remarks : " We may be allowed to ask, would not the time and ingenuity spent on worsted-work, satin-stitch, bead-work, and the like frivolities, be better employed if it were occupied in preparing an offering to God, for the adornment of His holy dwelling places ? Hour after hour is cheerfully sacrificed in the preparation of useless trifles for those charity bazaars, which would fain teach us that we can serve God and mammon : no time is then thought too much,...

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