Whimwhams, by Four of Us

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S.G. Goodrich, 1828 - 204 pages
 

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Page 71 - A' made a finer end and went away an it had been any christom child; a' parted even just between twelve and one, even at the turning o' the tide: for after I saw him fumble with the sheets and play with flowers and smile upon his fingers...
Page 152 - No; were I at the strappado, or all the racks in the world, I would not tell you on compulsion. Give you a reason on compulsion ! if reasons were as plenty as blackberries, I would give no man a reason upon compulsion, I. P.
Page 43 - I labour with eternal drought, And restless wish, and rave : my parched throat Finds no relief, nor heavy eyes repose : But if a slumber haply does invade My weary limbs, my fancy's still awake ; Thoughtful of drink, and eager, in a dream, Tipples imaginary pots of ale In vain; awake, I find the settled thirst Still gnawing, and the pleasant phantom curse.
Page 142 - He wiU come again ;" and these words came upon the mind, rather than upon the ear. I was conscious of them rather than heard them ; they were like the voices in dreams. It was all like a dream ; a mysterious intuition. I observed that the shells never crashed beneath her footsteps nor did her garments rustle. In the bright awful calm of noon, and in the rush of the storm, there was the same heavy stillness over her. When the winds were so furious that I could scarcely stand in their sweep, the light...
Page 148 - Before they departed on a voyage, "to plunder, slash, and slay," (in which, by the way, they were involved in one awful doom by the blowing up of a powder magazine), the maiden was carried to the island where her pirate lover's treasure was hidden, and made to swear with horrible rites that until his return, if it were not till the day of judgment, she would guard it from the search of all mortals.
Page 139 - She turned instantly, and fixing on me a pair of the largest and most melancholy blue eyes I ever beheld, said quietly, " He will come again." Before I had time for a rejoinder, she passed almost imperceptibly round the jutting of the rock, and disappeared; leaving me gazing upon the place where she vanished with the feeling of one who awakes from a vivid dream, before the illusion has given place to the conviction of reality.
Page 143 - The last time I stood with her, was just at the evening of one tranquil day. It was a lovely sunset, and as lovely a scene for one, I think, as this globe can afford. A few gold-edged clouds crowned the hills of the distant continent, and the sun had gone down behind them. The ocean lay, gorgeous as a monarch in his purple robes, beneath the reflected blushes of the sky, and even the ancient rocks seemed smiling in the glance of the departing day. Peace, deep peace, was the pervading power. The waters,...
Page 118 - And what is he who smokes thee now ? A little moving heap, That soon like thee to fate must bow, With thee in dust must sleep. But though thy ashes downward go, Thy essence rolls on high ; Thus when my body must lie low, My soul shall cleave the sky. TO THE SOUTH WIND. BY JW MILLER. BALMY breeze from the blossomy South, Kissing my lips with thy tender mouth, Touching my forehead with delicate hand, Lifting my hair up with breath so bland, And bathing my head with scents of flowers, Borne from...
Page 137 - ... it is not that withering sensation of separation that invades us in the depth of woods or the mazes of the wilderness. It is the vast solitude of the sea, and no one who has not known it, can imbibe the faintest idea of it. In the most profound solitudes of the land, there are some varieties of sound, or at least of sight, that have a power to break the stillness of the mind ; but on the sea there are none. The dashing of the waves...
Page 137 - I believe there are few minds similarly constituted in this respect; from the earliest action of my thinking faculties, from the hour I learned the truth, that all which lives must die, the thought of dissolution has haunted me. I have an intense dread of death; and the falling of a leaf, a gray hair, or a faded cheek has power to chill me. But here, in the recesses of these eternal rocks, with only a cloudless sky above, and an ocean before me, for the first time in my life have I shaken off the...

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