Bell's British Theatre, Volume 9

Front Cover
John Bell
J. Bell, 1797
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Page 27 - But you're not to stand so, with your hands in your pockets. Take your hands from your pockets, Roger and from your head, you blockhead you. See how Diggory carries his hands. They're a little too stiff, indeed, but that's no great matter.
Page 12 - Ay, your times were fine times indeed; you have been telling us of them for many a long year. Here we live in an old rumbling mansion, that looks for all the world like an inn, but that we never see company.
Page 37 - I don't know how our Bridget, the cook-maid, is not very communicative upon these occasions. Should we send for her, she might scold us all out of the house.
Page 24 - No, sir, but if you can inform us TONY. Why, gentlemen, if you know neither the road you are going, nor where you are, nor the road you came, the first thing I have to inform you is, that you have lost your way.
Page 18 - As I live, the most intimate friend of Mr. Hastings, my admirer. They are never asunder. I believe you must have seen him when we lived in town.
Page 25 - It's a damn'd long, dark, boggy, dirty, dangerous way. Stingo, tell the gentlemen the way to Mr. Hardcastle's! (Winking upon the Landlord.) Mr. Hardcastle's, of Quagmire Marsh, you understand me. LAND. Master Hardcastle's!
Page 40 - So! I find this fellow's civilities begin to grow troublesome. But who can be angry at those assiduities which are meant to please him? Ha! what do I see?
Page 33 - We approve your caution and hospitality, Sir. (To Hastings.) I have been thinking, George, of changing our travelling dresses in the morning.
Page 49 - I vow, since inoculation began, there is no such thing to be seen as a plain woman ; so one must dress a little particular, or one may escape in the crowd.
Page 78 - Grew sweet to sense, and lovely to the eye, 'Till at the last a cruel spoiler came, Cropt this fair rose, and rifled all its sweetness, Then cast it like a loathsome weed away.

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