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At feasts made for princes, wi' princes I've been,
Whar the great shine o' splendour has dazzled my een:
But a sight sae delightfu' I trow I ne'er spied,
As the bonnie blythe blink o'my ain fire-side,

My ain fire-side, my ain fire-side,

Oh! cheering's the blink o' my ain fire-side.
Ance mair, God be thankit! by my ain heartsome ingle,
Wi' the friends o' my youth I cordially mingle:
Nae form to compel me to seem wae or glad,
I may laugh when I'm merry-and sigh when I'm sad;
Nae fausehood to dreed, and nae malice to fear,
But truth to delight me—and friendship to cheer.
Of a' roads to happiness ever was tried,
There's nane half sae sure as ane's ain fire-side,

Ane's ain fire-side, ane's ain fire-side,

Oh! happiness sits by ane’s ain fire-side!
When I draw in my stool, on my cozie hearth-stane,
My heart loups sae light, I scarce ken’t for my ain.
Care's flown on the winds—its clean out o' sight,
Past sorrows they seem but as dreapis o'the night;
I hear but kent voices-kent faces I see,
And mark fond affection glint saft frae ilk ee.
Nae fleechings o' flattery-nae boastings o'pride,
'Tis heart speaks to heart at ane's ain fire-side;

My ain fire-side, my ain fire-side;

0! there's nought to compare to my ain fire-side These pleasures of one's own fire-side are enjoyed in all their luxury in the season of winter. Then is the time for that social and intellectual intercourse which constitutes the sweetest charm of human life.

Winter, thou daughter of the storm,
I love thee when the day is o'er,
Spite of the tempest's outward roar;
Queen of the tranquil joys that weave
The charm around the sudden eve;
The thick’ning footsteps thro' the gloom,
Telling of those we love come home;
The candles lit, the cheerful board,
The dear domestic group restor'd ;
The fire that shews the looks of glee,
The infants standing at our knee ;
The busy news, the sportive tongue,
The laugh that makes us still feel young;
The health to those we love, that now
Are far as ocean winds can blow;

The health to those who with us grew,
And still stay with us tried and true ;
The wife that makes life glide away
One long and lovely marriage day.
Then music comes till-round us creep
The infant list'ners half asleep;
And busy tongues are loud no more,
And, Winter, thy sweet eve is o'er.

ANON. The character of the Savioar of the world was eminently social. How condescending, how friendly, bow affable, was Jesus in his social manners! The dignified gravity he displayed in all his actions and discourses, so consistent with his character, hindered him not from being accessible and social. He shunned not human society, he condemned not the indifferent customs he found in it, he denied himself not its innocent pleasures. On the contrary, he sometimes participated in them; he honoured, by his presence, the marriage at Cana in Galilee. He aimed at nothing particular in his daily converse; but conformed on these occasions to established usages, whenever they were neither sinful nor superstitious.

Those who wish to enjoy social pleasure in its native purity, must have clear notions of the numerous objects concerning man, his nature, destinations, occupations, and his most important interests. A man who is destitute of this kind of knowledge, cannot but experience the most unpleasant sensations himself, as well as render the time heavy to those with whom he associates. How listless he becomes, so soon as his senses cease to be interested; how utterly incapable of enjoying the noble pleasures which the attentive and better informed derive from the mutual communication of their ideas, observations, experience, and judgments! All the delight which wit, understanding, acuteness of judgment, the arts and sciences, can afford, is lost to him; and, how great is that loss! What sensual pleasures and amusements are capable of indemnifying him for it! Irregular and violent passions are the greatest enemies of all social pleasure. Their poisonous breath destroys it

in the bud, the mere sight of them frightens it away. Under how many different imposing masks, and deceitful shapes, do these monsters creep into the communion of life ; and how is it possible that genuine happiness can exist where envy or jealousy, selfishness or avarice, calumny or uncharitableness, are not carefully excluded. Nor will the mere absence of these features be sufficient to the benevolent purposes of life; since a man must be endowed with active feelings of philanthropy, good-humour, and disinterestedness. He must have the liberality of mind which can

deriye pleasure from the superior advantages and ac.complishments of others; whilst it is backward in displaying its own. He must be free, communicative, and ingenuous, and appear to exist not so much for others as for himself. Indeed, what can be a more absurd contradiction, than to wish for pleasure from social intercourse, without yourself being of a social disposition. Inevitable disappointment and disgust must ensue from such a, temperament; and it is a sorry compliment to a generous host, to frequent bis table as a cure for spleen, or to lull the misanthropic „suggestions of personal discontent.

Truly to enjoy, therefore, the pleasures of social conversation, in their natural purity and zest, we must strive to attain all those accomplishments of mind and heart, which will qualify us for justly appreciating them ; we must cultivate our understanding, accustom ourselves to reflect on what we see and hear, and thus collect a treasure of useful and agreeable knowledge, which we can exchange in conversation with friends and acquaintances for the results of their experience and observation. But we must never desire to be the principal person in a social circle, nor a focus in which the chief interest of the company is to concentrate. And, whilst we abide by the rules which custom has long prescribed for the regulation of its pleasures, we should independently reject such as may undermine the purity of our established sentiments, or injure the inestimable benefits which we derive from good health.

Ah! who to sober measurement

Time's happy swiftness brings,
When birds of Paradise have lent

Their plumage for his wings ?
All in their stations move,

And each performs his part,
In all the cares of life and love,

With sympathizing heart.
Form'd for the purest joys,

By one desire possest;
One aim the zeal of all employs,

To make each other blest.
No bliss can equal theirs,

Where such affections meet;
While praise devout, and mingled pray’rs

Make their communion sweet.
'Tis the same pleasure fills

The breast in worlds above;
Where joy like morning dew distils,

And all the air is love.

Montgomery thus speaks of the pleasures of home:

There is a spot of earth supremely blest,
A dearer, sweeter spot than all the rest,
Where man, creation's tyrant, casts aside
His sword and sceptre, pageantry and pride,
While in his soften’d looks benignly blend
The sire, the son, the husband, brother, friend;
Here woman reigns; the mother, daughter, wife,
Strews with fresh flowers the narrow way of life :
In the clear heav'n of her delightful eye,
An angel guard of loves and graces lie;
Around her knees domestic duties meet,
And fire-side pleasures gambol at her feet.
Where shall that land, that spot of earth, be found ?
Art thou a man?-a patriot?-look around ;
Oh! thou shalt find, howe'er thy footsteps roam,

That land the country, and that spot THY HOME! Mrs. Hamilton interestingly describes the social pleasures to be enjoyed at home, in the following verses :

O, I hae seen great anes, and been in great ha's,
Many lords and many ladies a' cover'd with braws;

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At feasts made for princes, wi' princes I've been,
Whar the great shine o' splendour has dazzled my een:
But a sight sae delightfu' I trow I ne'er spied,
As the bonnie blythe blink o' my ain fire-side,

My ain fire-side, my ain fire-side,

Oh! cheering's the blink o' my ain fire-side.
Ance mair, God be thankit! by my ain heartsome ingle,
Wi' the friends o'my youth I cordially mingle:
Nae form to compel me to seem wae or glad,
I may laugh when I'm merry-and sigh when I'm sad ;
Nae fausehood to dreed, and nae malice to fear,
But truth to delight me—and friendship to cheer.
Of a' roads to happiness ever was tried,
There's nane half sae sure as ane's ain fire-side,

Ane's ain fire-side, ane's ain fire-side,

Oh! happiness sits by ane's ain fire-side!
When I draw in my stool, on my cozie hearth-stane,
My heart loups sae light, I scarce ken’t for my ain.
Care's flown on the winds-its clean out o' sight,
Past sorrows they seem but as dreadis o’the night;
I hear but kent voices-kent faces I see,
And mark fond affection glint saft frae ilk ee.
Nae fleechings o' fattery-nae boastings o'pride,
'Tis heart speaks to heart at ane's ain fire-side;

My ain fire-side, my ain fire-side;

o! there's nought to compare to my ain fire-side These pleasures of one's own fire-side are enjoyed in all their luxury in the season of winter. Then is the time for that social and intellectual intercourse which constitutes the sweetest charm of human life.

Winter, thou daughter of the storm,
I love thee when the day is o'er,
Spite of the tempest's outward roar;
Queen of the tranquil joys that weave
The charm around the sudden eve;
The thick’ning footsteps thro' the gloom,
Telling of those we love come home;
The candles lit, the cheerful board,
The dear domestic group restor'd;
The fire that shews the looks of glee,
The infants standing at our knee;
The busy news, the sportive tongue,
The laugh that makes us still feel young ;
The health to those we love, that now
Are far as ocean winds can blow;

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