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38-Likes talking of her acquaintance who are unhappily married-finds consolation from their misfortunes.

39—Ill-nature increases.
40—Very meddling, and very officious.

41-If rich, as a dernier resort, makes love to some young man without fortune.

42—Not succeeding, rails against the male sex. 43—Partiality for cards increases, and scandal commences. 44–Severe against the manners of the age. 45—Strong predilection for a vagabond rake. 46—Enraged at his desertion. 47—Becomes desponding, and takes snuff. 48—Turns all her sensibility towards cats and dogs. 49—Adopts a female relation to attend upon her.

53— Becomes disgusted with the world, and vents all her ill-humour on this unfortunate relation.

If such characters do exist, they are more to be pitied than unfeelingly ridiculed. It is, indeed, difficult to account for the silly kind of ridicule with which some of the best women in the world have been treated, for no other reason than because they have lived single to a time of life, which brings with it the impertinent epithet of “Old Maid.” Yet, amongst this class, may be found some of the most amiable, sensible, noble-minded women, who have had fine persons, possess cultivated minds, and were apparently calculated for happy wives, tender mothers, and the increase of every social comfort. On the other hand, the very opposite characteristics are often found in women, whose good fortune has joined them to a husband.

If an elderly single woman is very neat in her per son, and very correct in her conduct, the dissipated married slattern, as an apology for herself, endeavours to depreciate those excellencies, by calling them old maidish ways. It is to novel writers that single woinen are indebted for the odium cast upon them: a maiden aunt being generally delineated as a censorious illtempered pride. Yet, how many circumstances daily occur to make the most valuable women old maids; which are highly honourable to the female character. One, from filial piety, has lived single, to ensure the comfort and support of a beloved parent; another,

with a soul capable of the strongest and most'tender attachment, meets with her kindred mind, their sentiments are congenial, their hearts are united, they look forward to a life of conjugal felicity, the day for their union is fixed, happiness appears to be within their group; but, in an unexpected moment, death interferes, and deprives her of the man of her affections. Yet no second blossom springs from the hope that bas thus been scathed, and in generous singleness of heart, she lives upon the memory of bim, whom no future passion can ever supersede.This woman is no prude, and could give a better account of what really deserves the name of love, than many of her married friends. She rejoices to see young people happily united, and strives to promote their felicity: yet, as she is an old maid, of course every flirt thinks she has a right to laugh at her expense. It is she, without sentiment or sensibility, who catches at the first offer, with no better motive than that of securing herself from a place amongst those whom she has so often endeavoured to ridicule, that is really culpable. In females, however, I have always considered the habit of ridiculing old maids, as the grossest indelicacy; for what is it but inviting the gentlemen to rescue them from so dreaded an evil. Some parents make old maids of their daughters, by secluding them too much from society. Young women who are not allowed to mix with well-chosen company, are generally awkward and unpleasing, and are consequently neglected by sensible and well-informed men. But, ought women thus disadvantageously brought up, to be made the subjects of ill-natured ribaldry? In my opinion, a new-married girl, who, the first week of her exaltation, puts on matronly airs, and, with a supercilious majesty, takes the precedence of a sensible amiable aunt, is a much more ridiculous character; and it is infinitely better to remain single, than to form an uncongenial unión.

Young men too frequently choose a wife for a beautiful face, a fine voice, or a delicate finger on the keys of her harpsichord. These are pleasing

things in a young lady, but not essentials. i. I believe the lover is sometimes entrapped by accomplishments that are the source of the greatest uneasiness to a busband; for if a wife possesses nothing better than these external graces, she will, perhaps, be dancing and singing, and seeking opportunities to excite admiration, when she should be cultivating the minds of her children, or, by a well-directed tenderness, soothing the sorrows of her husband under some heavy affliction. Young women who have had an irreligious education, have no taste for those excellencies in a character that are calculated to make a good husband. If you were to tell them that a young man was very pious, they would never believe that he could possibly enter a room with grace, or have the polished manners of a gentleman. If you assure them that, from principles of conscience, he will not fight a duel, they will despise him as a coward; yet such a man only is the one to marry. A female should think, and consider seriously, before she solemnly vows to honour and obey any man; for a good woman will find it very difficult either to honour or obey a bad man. I have heard young ladies say, that they liked dashing young men. I thought it was a strange expression, and made a point of learning what a dashing young man was.

I found it to be a most appropriate epithet for one of those high-spirited souls, who have courage enough to dash through the commands of God and the decorum of society; that seduce innocent girls, and call it gallantry; that spend their nights in a tavern, and dash out, at the dawn of day, full of wine and mischief, knocking down watch men, and insulting every sober person they meet; and, after dashing through thick and thin for a short space of time, too often dash out of this world into an eternal state, by the sword or pistol. If young women wish to be noticed by sensible, worthy men, they must adorn themselves with modest attire, and, if the idea was not too obsolete, I would add,-with shamefacedness. I see no reason why young people should not display taste in dress, as well as in any

cares, and from the anxiety attending the parental duties; it has grcater liberty in the disposal of time and money, and the freer power to will and to do. The unmarried have it in their power to be more useful to the world, and to promote the general welfare of mankind; so that we might perhaps venture to decide, that, upon the whole, there is as much single as married happiness in the world.”

It would be very unjust to apply the following to single aged females in general, though it may be applicable to a few :

THE OLD MAID'S THERMOMETER.

From 1 to 14-a child.

At 15—Anxious for coming out, and for the attention of the men.

16—Begins to have some idea of the tender passion. 17-Talks of love in a cottage, and disinterested affection.

18-Fancies herself in love with some handsome man who has flattered her.

19—Is a little more difficult to be pleased, in consequence of being noticed.

20-Commences fashionable, and dashes.

21-Still more confident in her attractions, and expects a brilliant establishment.

22-Refuses a good offer, because he is not a man of fashion.

23—Flirts with every man she meets.
24_Wonders she is not married.
25—Rather more circumspect in her conduct.

26-Begins to think a large fortune not quite so indispensable.

27—Prefers the conversation of rational men to flirting.

28—Wishes to be married in a quiet way, with a comfortable income.

29-Almost despairs of entering the married state. 30—Rather afraid of being called An Old Maid. 31-An additional love of dress.

32—Professes to dislike balls, finding it difficult to get a partner.

33—Wonders how men can leave the society of sensible women, to flirt with chits.

34–Affects good humour in her conversation with men.
35—Jcalous at the praises of other women.
36–Quarrels with her friend, who is lately married.
37—Thinks herself slighted in society.

38-Likes talking of her acquaintance who are unhappily married-finds consolation from their misfortunes.

39—Ill-nature increases.
40—Very meddling, and very officious.

41–If rich, as a dernier resort, makes love to some young man without fortune.

42—Not succeeding, rails against the male sex. 43—Partiality for cards increases, and scandal commences. 44-Severe against the manners of the age. 45—Strong predilection for a vagabond rake. 46—Enraged at his desertion. 47—Becomes desponding, and takes snuff. 48—Turns all her sensibility towards cats and dogs. 49—Adopts a female relation to attend upon her.

53—Becomes disgusted with the world, and vents all her ill-humour on this unfortunate relation.

If such characters do exist, they are more to be pitied than unfeelingly ridiculed. It is, indeed, difficult to account for the silly kind of ridicule with which some of the best women in the world have been treated, for no other reason than because they have lived single to a time of life, which brings with it the impertinent epithet of “Old Maid.” Yet, amongst this class, may be found some of the most amiable, sensible, noble-minded women, who have had fine persons, possess cultivated minds, and were apparently calculated for happy wives, tender mothers, and the increase of every social comfort. On the other hand, the very opposite characteristics are often found in women, whose good fortune has joined them to a husband.

If an elderly single woman is very neat in her per son, and very correct in her conduct, the dissipated married slattern, as an apology for herself

, endeavours to depreciate those excellencies, by calling them old maidish ways. It is to novel writers that single wonen are indebted for the odium cast upon them: a maiden aunt being generally delineated as a censorious illtempered pride. Yet, how many circumstances daily occur to make the most valuable women old maids; which are bighly honourable to the female character. One, from filial piety, has lived single, to ensure the comfort and support of a beloved parent; another,

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