An universal history, from the earliest accounts to the present time

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Page 374 - Goths themfelves conveyed thitlier, as to places of fafety, fuch as they were delirous fliould be fpared. Many of the ftatues of the gods that had been left entire by the emperors as excellent pieces of art, were on this occafion deftroyed, either by the Goths, who, though moftly Arians, were zealous...
Page 439 - Italy, as he was remarkably tall, he was admitted among the emperor's guards, and continued in that station till the above year ; when putting himself at the head of the barbarians in the Roman pay, who, though of different nations, had unanimously chosen him for their...
Page 311 - Christians through the city, and then thrown into a fierce fire, kindled for that purpose in the amphitheatre. As the Egyptians ascribed the overflowing of the Nile, to which was owing the fertility of their country, to the benign influence of their god Serapis, they concluded that now he was destroyed the river would no longer overflow, and that a general famine would ensue; but when they observed...
Page 439 - Odoacer is faid to have been a man of uncommon parts, capable alike of commanding an army or governing a ftate. Having left his own country when he was very young, to ferve in Italy, as he was of a ftature remarkably tall, he was admitted among the emperor's guards, and continued in that ftation...
Page 164 - On his march he was surrounded on all sides by the barbarians, who moved about the country in great bodies ; but he put them to flight with a handful of men, cut great numbers of them in pieces, and took some prisoners.
Page 100 - Romans, rifing unexpectedly out of their ambufcade, attacked them before they could draw up their forces, cut great numbers of them in pieces, and obliged the reft to repafs the river in the utmoft confufion.
Page 73 - ... of the public, and the poverty to which he was reduced by his own fault. Constantius heard these reproaches with patience ; and having persuaded those who made them in Diocletian's name to stay a few days with him, he sent word to the most wealthy persons in the province, that he wanted money, and that they had now an opportunity of showing whether or not they really loved their prince. Upon this notice, every one strove who should be foremost in carrying to the exchequer all their gold, silver...
Page 41 - Cambridge ; where, upon taking a great cold, he fell into' a diftemper, which in a few days put an end to his life.
Page 209 - ... they refenting, joined the Perfians, and continued faithful to them to the laft. However, he wrote to Arfaces, king of Armenia, enjoining him to keep his troops in readinefs to execute the orders he fhould foon tranfmit.

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