The Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Magazine, Volume 5

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Edward Hungerford Goddard
Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, 1859
Includes proceedings of the annual general meetings of the Wiltshire Archaeological and Natural History Society.

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Page 172 - Thou hast been in Eden the garden of God; every precious stone was thy covering, the sardius, topaz, and the diamond, the beryl, the onyx, and the jasper, the sapphire, the emerald, and the carbuncle, and gold...
Page 187 - And I saw an angel come down from heaven, having the key of the bottomless pit and a great chain in his hand. And he laid hold on the dragon, that old serpent, which is the Devil, and Satan, and bound him a thousand years, And cast him into the bottomless pit, and shut him up, and set a seal upon him, that he should deceive the nations no more, till the thousand years should be fulfilled: and after that he must be loosed a little season.
Page 187 - And he opened the bottomless pit; and there arose a smoke out of the pit, as the smoke of a great furnace; and the sun and the air were darkened by reason of the smoke of the pit.
Page 178 - What mean ye by these stones? then ye shall answer them, That the waters of Jordan were cut off before the ark of the covenant of the LORD; when it passed over Jordan, the waters of Jordan were cut off: and these stones shall be for a memorial unto the children of Israel for ever.
Page 148 - In that day shall there be an altar to the Lord in the midst of the land of Egypt, and a pillar at the border thereof to the Lord.
Page 187 - And to the angel of the church in Philadelphia write; These things saith he that is holy, he that is true, he that hath the key of David, he that openeth, and no man shutteth; and shutteth, and no man openeth...
Page 388 - Ne of his speche dangerous ne digne, .But in his teching discrete and benigne. To drawen folk to heven, with fairenesse, By good ensample, was his besinesse...
Page 388 - But it were any persone obstinat, What so he were of highe, or low estat, Him wolde he snibben ' sharply for the nones. A better preest I trowe that nowher a non is. He waited after no pompe ne reverence, Ne maked him no spiced * conscience, But Cristes lore, and his apostles twelve, He taught, but first he folwed it himselve.
Page 15 - So that the country-people had a proverb, that " if the abbot of Glastonbury might marry the abbess of Shaftesbury, their heir would have more land than the king of England.
Page 77 - It may also hold plea of any personal actions, of debt, trespass on the case, or the like, where the debt or damages do not amount to forty shillings...

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