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Leeds and Liverpool, 300l.—Trent and Mersey, 15301-East India Pock, 179]. pen share.—West India, 1991.-The Strand BRIDGE, 121. 10s.-West Middlesex WATER, Wonks, 50l. 10s.-GAs Light CoMPANY, 8.5l. and on the advance in London, and

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--Alohanetical List of BANKRuptcies and Divinexps, announced between the 20th of June, and the 20th of July, 1818, extracted from the London Gazettes.

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Aphton J. Tower firect

Aihlay T. Gough sq.;are

Antrébus J. castleton, Lancashire

a pedaile G. North Shields

Bravo J. Loudon was

blanchoway L. Power street, Picca-
dilly

Journ. P. W. Wapping
Buckeridge G. Pangbourn
Brooke J. Bristol
Bruce A. J. Brown, and G. Scott,
London
Bradley G. Houndsditch
Brcadbent W. Hull
Kryaat, w, Garden court. Temple
cross J. Chesterton, Cambridgeshire
cox G. N. Edgware road
curry T. North Shields - “..
coles w. F. Coles, and W. Williams,
Mincing lane
Crompton T. Essex street, Strand
coombs J. Windsor
Calvert A, Sydenham
Cole of , Plymouth -
clerk's. Tring, Hertfordshire.
creipin G. De Maumy, Wigmore

street
crohat P. and T. Stevenson, Li-

verpool cumberlodge J. George yard, Lombard street Durham A. Birmingham Duffel G. Birmingham Davies J. Robettonwatham, Pembrokeshire ...to awks T. Lath Eouton R. Liverpool pura al H. Southampton place, Camberwell powns S. M. Reading puckworth H. jun. 1;illiter lane yelliot J. Southampton Eales W. Swallow street Ewcrett N. wiltshire Jodgar R. Hammond's court, Mincing lane

Longbridge Deverell,

.
Edwards T. sen, and T. Edwards,
jun. Bradford, Wilts
Fry E. Houndsditch
French A, B, Old Squth Sea House

Feathersonhaugh J. st. Mary at hill,
Lower “ames street

Fisher W. Union place, Lambeth

Fairlamb J wynyatt urett, Goswell
street read

Glover D., Gutter lane
Grit rson S. Barnsley, Yorkshire
Halden E. Hazle end, Essex
Hamblin S. wootten under edge,
Gloucester shire
Harvey 6. Oxford street
Hatton T. warrington
Hoare Go and J. Delvalle, Ludgate

hiii
Hodson J. and M. Hargreaves, Li-
verpool
Homan B. Barking
Halcow S. Trafalgar souare, Stepney
Hamilton J. and W. Turkington,
Finch lane
Humbie W. Great St, Thomas
A.

Johnson J. Paradise street, Mary le

()
Jackson J Middleton, Norfolk
Jackson W. B. Exeter
Johnson T. B. Liverpool
jump J. and T. Hargrove, Fore street
Kent E. Gedney hill, Lincolnshire
Kelty As worcester
Kerkham J. Acre Farm Leek, Staf-
fordshire
Kirkpatrick J Liverpool
King W. 'i horpe. No folk
K1:...g.J. Swaffham, Norfolk
Lawson w. Whitby
Lloyd S. T. Leather lane
Lees J. Ealing
lees S. Hurst, Lancashire
Latham T. D. and J. Parry, Devon-
shire square
Lovegrove R. Arborfield, Berkshire
Lowcock G. jun. Crumpseli, Lan"

cashire
Ilynnell S. and W. and E. Perkins,
Chatham
Mercer w. Walton le Dale, Lan-
cashire

Matthewman, Queen street, cheapside
Mackcoull J. Worthing

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- -o-
Meteorological Results of the Atmospherical Pressure and Temperature, Evaporation,
Rain, Wind, and Clouds, deduced from Diurnal Observations, made at Manchester; by
THOMAS HANSoN, Surgeon.
Latitude 53° 25' North—Longitude 2° 10' West—of London.

Results for June, 1818.
Mean monthly pressure,29.88—maximum, 30.26—minimum,29.32—range, .94 of an inch.
Mean monthly temperature, 65°.1—maximum, 88°–minimum, 44°–range, 39°.
Greatest variation of pressure in 24 hours, .44 of an inch, which was on the 20th.
Greatest variation of temperature in 24 hours, 25°, which was on the 9th.
Spaces described by the curve formed from the mean daily pressure, 2.4 inches,
- number of changes, 11.
Monthly fall of rain, 2.205 inches—rainy days, 15—foggy, 0—snowy, 0–haily, 0.

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From the 1st to the 12th, the weather was unusually warm, and the atmosphere almost cloudless. The high temperature of 88° occurred about two o'clock P.M. of the 12th, when it was very clear and serene; the evening was sultry, and indicated thunder. A few drops of rain fell; but at Eccles there were very heavy showers, so as to drench the roads. The lightning and thunder about now lowered the temperature, which, with copious falls of rain, invigorated the drooping vegetation, and gave

t , energy to the enfeebled animal economy. Prevailing winds—north-west and south-west.

MONTH LY AGRIC U LTURA L REPORT.

-oHE charm is dissolved, a reaction has succeeded, and, in despite of the ice islands, and the conjectures of the learned, we have at length and in turn enjoyed a sum. mer as high in temperature as any, or most of those, which used to warm our ancestors. Harvest commenced, some ten days or a fortnight since, in the south-western counties, and will soon become general. The long-continued drought has greatly injured all the crops, wheat, it is to be hoped, least of all, as most able to endure drought, and generally productive in dry seasons. In some, perhaps many, parts, the wheat will be undoubtedly a great crop; in others, middling, below an average; and, upon scalding gravels, and weak arid soils, the produce will be light. The wheat plant has been universally tinged with mucor, in consequence of atmospheric vicissitude and drought; and considerable quantities of blighted and smutted wheat may be expected. The whole of the spring crops—barley, oats, beans, peas, will be short, throughout England; in some parts, the barley will barely return seed. On the other hand, letters from various districts in Scotland ep: esent barley and oats as probable to be the best crops, the wheats not promising to reach an average. Hay, of every species, well got, but universally light; and green food never more scarce, affording a cheerless prospect for winter. They who, having and well adapted, stocked it with lucerne, will have ample reason to applaud their foresight and economy. Little progress has been yet made in turnip sowing, for want of rain; and great part of the plants, already above ground, have perished, with the exception of some of the northern counties, where, some showers having opportunely fallen, large breadths of turnips have been sown, and are in a healthy and flourishing state, Hops and fruit, particularly the orchard fruits, promise to be most abundant, equal to the most productive seasons; pears and plums are said to be exceptions. Many hop plantations are as clean and pure, in leaf and bime, as the oldest planter was witnessed. The potato crop greatly iu want of rain. The weau". C &ll

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72 Political Affairs in July. [July 1,

been extremely favorable for the sheep-shearing, and the clip will be most valuable, as wool is perhaps higher in price than ever known before, and still apparently advancing. Both fat cattle and lean somewhat lower; stores considerably so, on account of the want of food. Pigs scarce and dear. Milch and in calf cows greatly in re. quest; and horscs, of good quality, at extremely high prices. The demand from abroad for English well-bred mares has been greater, within the last twelve months, than ever

before experienced.

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PO LITICAL AFFAIRS IN JULY ;

Containing official Papers and Authentic Documents.
-o-

Fr ANC e. HE time having arrived when, nnder the faith of the European legitimates, the foreign troops who protect the Bourbon government in France ought to be removed, and the wishes of “the universal French nation” being pretty well understood, considerable agitation exists in regard to the course to be pursued. A meeting of the sovereigns is about to take place at Aix-laChapelle, and the Duke of Wellington, their chief agent, has lately passed several times between London, Paris, and Brussels. The difficulty scoms to be to raise the means of sustaining these troops in their most honourable Grmployment. The French government says, it cannot pay any longer; the British peace expenditure far exceeds the revenue, and the new Parliament cannot be relied on; while the Sovereigns have no resources out of their own dominions ! ‘Phe alternatives, therefore, are obvious; and the dilemma most interesting to the friends of civil liberty. How different would have been the prospects of the Bourbons, if the Proclamation from Hartwell, if the Charter, if the Declarations of Alexander, if the Treaty of Tontainbleau, or if even the last Convention of Paris, had been scrupulously respected GREAT BRITAIN. We have inserted in our Provfficial Intelligence the numbers at the close of the poll during the late clection-contests, as matter of record; and we are happy to have it in our power to state, that never were exertions greater than have been made every where to reject the members of the late corrupt Parliament, and that they have been generally successful. Failures, wherever

they took place, arose from the want of
previous arrangements, from the non-
formation of canvassing committees,
from the deficiency of funds to convey
the distant voters to the place of elec-
tion, and often from the difficulty of
procuring worthy candidates;–causes,
which it is to be hoped will not affect
future contests.
The people have, however, triumphed
in this general election far beyond any
other election since the accession of the
house of Guelph; and, having done their
duty in placing in the House of Com-
mons AN, UNMANAGEABLE MINority, it
remains that that minority do their duty
to the people. What that duty is, many
of these popular representatives may
affect not to know; and others, in spite
of appearances, may truly not know.
To remove all equivocation, we will
take it on ourselves to speak for the
well-informed part of our fellow citizens,
and state what we conceive the people
of the United Kingdom expect at this
crisis, from their independent repre-
sentatives:–
1. The people expect, that no supplies
will be granted, and that divisions take
place on every pound, pound by pound,
till the Septennial Act has been repealed.
2. They expect, by the like means, that
the rotten boroughs be disfranchised, and
that their number of representatives be
distributed among the counties and un-
represented towns.
3. They expect, by the like means, that,
in towns, the right of voting be conferred
on the inhabitant house-holders.
4. They expect, by the like means,
that the British troops be forthwith with.
drawn from France, and be not again
employed in regulating the governments
of independent nations.
5. They expect, by the like means, that
the unnecessary standing army be dis-
banded.

6. They

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6. They expect, by the like means, to see expunged from the statute books the unjust laws of the 56th of Geo. III. eap. 22 and 23, which condemned the Emperor Napoleon to perpetual imprisonment in British custody. 7. They expect, by the like means, to see a general revision of the fiscal laws, and the removal of all those clauses which have the effect of oppressing the people, and of exposing them to vexatious pehalties and extortions. 8. They expect also, that creditors shall be allowed by law to arrange with their debtors as their own proper affair, and that the law shall be made to favour such settlements, and not be rendered a means of obstruction for the purpose of transferring the property of the debtor into the pockets of lawyers. 9. They expect, also, to see some eompromise take place between the mo. of the rich, and the wants and sufferings of those who are not rich. 10. They expect, by the like means, to obtain a repeal of the Corporation and Test Acts. 11. They expect, by the like means, to see the Catholics of Ireland placed on a footing of civil equality with their Protestant felíow-citizens. 12. They expect, by the like means, to see the Bill of Indemnity, 58 Geo. III. eap. 6, repealed.

Political Affairs in July.

73 13. They expect that no supplies will

be granted to aid the cause of foreign

despotism in South America; but, if any

interference take place, that the indepen

dence of the new republican governments will be maintained with all the resources of the British empire. 14. They expect, by the like means, to see the Alien Laws repealed. 15. They expect, by the like means, to see informations ea officio declared illegal. - 16. They expect, by the like means, to see a law passed which shall cause all juries to be called from the qualified classes in exact rotation, without any packing or selecting. 17. They expect, by the like means, to see a general revision of the Penal Laws. 18. They expect, by the like means, to see the repeal of the Corn-Biłł, that the necessaries of life may find their true level. 19. They expect, by the like means, to see a radical modification of the tythe system. The following account of the net produce of all the permanent Taxes of Great Britain, taken for two years, ending respectively the 5th of January, 1817, and the 5th of January, 1818, was lately laid before the House of Commons:—

Jan. 5, 1817. Jan. 5, 1818. €gasolitiated Customs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42,731,751 | f 2,973,295 Permanent, Anno 1813 . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 (5,885 437,017 Isle of Man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,180 7,144 Quarantine Duty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17,716 17, 112 Canal and Dock Ditto . . . . . . . . . . . 28,241 21,510 Temporary or War Duty, 1809 . . . . (made permanent \ 1,080,077 1,745,212 Ditto Ditto, 1810 Anno 1816. 47,782 100,486 and 1811 - . . . . . — Excise - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - * * * * 15,378,406 14,026,703 British Ships, 1806. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292.30() 577,850 Do. Do. 1811 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 516,640 471.4 5 Foreign IDO. . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * 87,640 84,364 ——Stamps, 1815 ... - e s - - - - - - - - - - - * * * * 5,965,434 6,337,423 Lottery Licences • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 4,298 3,479 — Assessed Taxes, 1898 ' ' ' ' ' ' ' " " ' " " ' " ' " 5,782,875 6,125,384 Letter Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,426,000 1,538,000 Land Taxcs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 1,069,417 1,1: 7,551 Hawkers and Pedlars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * 25,86() 23, 30 Seizures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * - - - - - - - - 14,518 9.447 Proffers . . . . . . . . . . . • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 608 624 Compositions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - Fines and Forfeitures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 100 1,435 Rent of a Light-house . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 6 Do. Alum Mines . . . . . . . . . . * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 864 900 Alienation Duty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,049 2,582 Hackney Coaches and Chairs, 1711 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10,692 10,800 Do. . . . . . . . * 1784 - - - - - - - - - - - - * * * * 12,473 14.450 Husbandry Horses . . . . . . . . 1793 . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - 3 Two-wheeled Carriages . . . . 1802 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400 Four-wheeled Do. . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - * * * * * * * * * -- 166 MonTHLY MAG, No. 315. L Servants

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74 Political Affairs in July. [Aug.f, Jan. 5, 1817. . 5, 1818. Servants. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1802 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . o: Jan. 5, 100 Horses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " " - • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * - 100. Windows - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,100 Husbandry Horses . . . . . . . . - - 100 Riding Do. . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - 100 Dogs . . . . . . . . . . . . • * * * * * * * * - 200 Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 7. 58 Houses . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - 117 Horses and Mules. . . . . . . . . . - 1 19 Horses . . . . . . . . -- - - - - - - - - - 26 16 Horse-dealers Licences • * - - - } . Servants - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 4. 7. Hair Powder . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - * Carriages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . — - 68 Bogs - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 65 10 per Cent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1806 . . . . - 6d. per Lib. on Pensions. . . . 1813 1,292 15. Do. Salaries • . . . — 190 6d. Do. Pensions. . . . 1814 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 694 5S0. 13. IDo. Salaries • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,879 6d. Do. Pensions . . . . 1815 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6,180 1,386 1S. Do. Salaries - - - - – - - - - - - . . . . . . . . . 14,635 2,117 6d, IDo. Pensions. . . . 1816 . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - 2,600 5,500 18. Do. Salaries • . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,000 10,800 6d. Do. Pensions - - - - 1817. . . . . . . . - 2,000 1S. Do. Salaries • . . . — . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - 4,000 Surplus Duties Sugar and Malt . . . . . . . . . . 550,528 1,588,265 annually granted, after WTobacco . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153,740 251,411 discharging 3,000,000l., X. Additional Malt . . . . . . . . . . 889,844 661,243 Exchequer Bills charged Annual Do. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 553,428 297,971 thereon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . J Land Tax on Offices . . . . . . 58,516 45,756 --|-37,260,874 38,320,355 T}uties Sugar and Malt . . . . . . . . . . 2,393,202 2,871,506 annually granted to pay / Tobacco - - - - - * - - - - - - - - - - 312,734 223,803 off 3,000,000l. Exche- >Additional Malt . . . . . . . . . . 220,604 34,226 quer Bills charged there \ Annual Do. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 786 on • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Land Tax on Offices . . . . . . 4,016 40,192,218 I 41,4

ST. HELENA.

The moral sense of mankind continues to receive fresh outrages in the treatment of Napoleon. His unpardonable crimes are, the being beloved in the countries which he governed, and the gloriously defending the independence of France against endless confederacies of envy and malice. Outrages on the moral feelings are, however, generally attended by a strong re-action; and the character of Napoleon was never, perhaps, so generally popular, as since the ignoble sought to debase him, and since the very lowest were employed to insult him. In this case, (unless the medical practice be successful to which Mr. O'Meara alludes,) we candidly confess that we should not wonder, as a necessary consequence of such folly, mistaken policy, or malignity, to behold Napoleon soon re-enthroued at the Tuileries; or to hear of such a war in France and Italy as that which prevailed in Spain during the absence of

Ferdinand. Malice generally defeats
itself, while its very success is infamous;
and magnanimity towards an enemy,
whether real or supposed, usually leads
to victory, while, if unsuccessful, it is
nevertheless glorious. -
The following documents, which
(within the month) have appeared
in the Morning Chronicle, and other
London papers, speak volumes on this
subject. - -
Letter of MR. O‘MEARA, the Surgeon, to
the Governor of St. Helena.
Sir, Longwood, April 19, 1818.
For ten months your Excellency has
several times manifested to me intentions
to subject me to the same restrictions as
the French prisoners, to which I have
always refused to consent: and I must beg
leave now to state, that your Excellency
has not the right to do so, as Napoleon
Bonapatte is uot considered as a prisoner
of war, otherwise than by virtue of an Act
of Parliament; and the other French (not
even the domestics) are not mamed in the
Bill, and could not be subjected to the
restrictions

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