The Sources of Health and Disease in Communities: Or, Elementary Views of "Hygiène," Illustrating Its Importance to Legislators, Heads of Families, &c

Front Cover
Allen and Ticknor, 1833 - 160 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 140 - And you, good yeomen, Whose limbs were made in England, show us here The mettle of your pasture ; let us swear That you are worth your breeding; which I doubt not; For there is none of you so mean and base, That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.
Page 104 - And there came also Nicodemus, which at the first came to Jesus by night, and brought a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about an hundred pound weight.
Page 103 - ... they were seized is described as a putrid fever, accompanied with hemorrhagic eruption and inflammation." All the civilized nations of antiquity have condemned the custom of interment in cities or towns. Wherever he travels, the antiquarian finds in the environs of the great ancient cities tumuli, funereal temples, vaults, excavations in caverns, masses of masonry of the most astounding magnitude, such as the pyramids, wonders of the Old World, that appear to have survived the wreck of ages,...
Page 43 - Landau, in 1793, eight were affected by a species of cretinism, and died before the expiration of the fifth year; thirty-three languished through a miserable existence of from nine to ten months...
Page 107 - Carcasses scattered over the field of battle have in all" times causal mortal sickness. We cannot afford space to relate all the accidents that occurred at the beginning of the French revolution. When, on account of the insalubrity of the church and neighborhood of the Cemetery of the Innocents, the government determined to have the remains of the bodies removed, M. Thouret, himself, who was director of the operations, narrowly escaped death from a putrid fever which he contracted in the performance...
Page 104 - ... did not communicate the disease to those who came near them. Seventeen deaths occurred, and upwards of two hundred children had measles, scarlet fever and various kindred eruptions. In further illustration of this subject, we may cite the instance of the French physicians who were deputed expressly to Egypt by the French government, to investigate the nature of the plague. It is their opinion that the superficial mode of interment that prevails there materially contributes to it. At almost every...
Page 83 - Nec tamen omnino temere illis solibus ulla comparebat avis, nec tristia saecla ferarum exibant silvis. Languebant pleraque morbo et moriebantur. Cum primis fida canum vis strata viis animam ponebat in omnibus aegre; extorquebat enim vitam vis morbida membris.
Page 61 - Those balmy spoils. As when to them who sail Beyond the Cape of Hope, and now are past...
Page 108 - ... the burial-ground of St. Eustace, in Paris, were moved in 1780, and of a number of children who were proceeding to the church to be questioned in their catechism, some fell down in a state of syncope, whilst other were subjected to other indispositions. Three workmen who had entered the vault died. These and numberless other instances that might be quoted, induced the French government...
Page 105 - At almost every village, they' found, near the habitations of the Arabs, mounds crumbling away, and exhibiting the naked bones of those who had been buried in them. In the whole of Lower Egypt, corpses are merely thrown on the surface of the earth. A hillock is raised over them, which is quickly demolished, or cracks in drying— while infectious vapours escape through 'the fissures, or flies are admitted to the bodies. The sting of these insects will subsequently produce pestilential tumours, of...

Bibliographic information