Age of Chivalry: Or Legends of King Arthur

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J. E. Tilton, 1863 - 414 pages
 

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Page 248 - ... and thou were the kindest man that ever struck with sword; and thou were the goodliest person that ever came among press of knights ; and thou was the meekest man and the gentlest that ever ate in hall among ladies; and thou were the sternest knight to thy mortal foe that ever put spear in the rest.
Page 240 - Then Sir Bedivere departed, and went to the sword, and lightly took it up, and went to the water side, and there he bound the girdle about the hilts, and then he threw the sword as far into the water as...
Page 240 - That is untruly said of thee, said the king ; therefore go thou lightly again, and do my command as thou art to me lief and dear, spare not, but throw it in.
Page 127 - Out upon the wharfs they came, Knight and burgher, lord and dame, And round the prow they read her name, The Lady of Shalott. Who is this? and what is here? And in the lighted palace near Died the sound of royal cheer; And they cross'd themselves for fear, All the knights at Camelot: But Lancelot mused a little space; He said, "She has a lovely face; God in his mercy lend her grace, The Lady of Shalott.
Page 382 - The eye of the trained hawk, the glance of the threemewed falcon was not brighter than hers. Her bosom was more snowy than the breast of the white swan, her cheek was redder than the reddest roses.
Page 197 - Camelot, for to joust and tourney yet once more before ye depart." But all the meaning of the king was to see Sir Galahad proved. So then were they all assembled in the meadow. Then Sir Galahad, by request of the king and queen, put on his harness and his helm, but shield would he take none for any prayer of the king. And the queen was in a tower, with all her ladies, to behold that tournament. Then Sir Galahad rode into the midst of the meadow; and there he began to break spears marvellously, so...
Page 256 - Or the grape's ecstatic juice. Flush'd with mirth and hope they burn, But none from Cattraeth's vale return, Save Aeron brave, and Conan strong, (Bursting through the bloody throng) And I, the meanest of them all, That live to weep and sing their fall.
Page 74 - ... charged them never to do outrageousity nor murder, and always to flee treason ; also, by no means to be cruel, but to give mercy unto him that asketh mercy, upon pain of forfeiture of their worship and lordship of King Arthur for evermore ; and always to do ladies, damosels, and gentlewomen succour, upon pain of death.
Page 127 - The first house by the water-side, Singing in her song she died, The Lady of Shalott. Under tower and balcony, By garden-wall and gallery, A gleaming shape she floated by, Dead-pale between the houses high, Silent into Camelot.
Page 239 - Alas, said the king, this is to me a full heavy sight, to see this noble duke so die for my sake, for he would have holpen me, that had more need of help than I. Alas, he would not complain him, his heart was so set to help me : now Jesu have mercy upon his soul ! Then Sir Bedivere wept .for the death of his brother.

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