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THE LIFE

OF THE REV.

JOSEPH BLANCO WHITE,

WRITTEN BY HIMSELF;

WITH

PORTIONS OF HIS CORRESPONDENCE.

EDITED BY

JOHN HAMILTON THOM.

IN THREE VOLUMES.

VOL. III.

LONDON:
JOHN CHAPMAN, 121, NEWGATE STREET.

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LONDON: RICHARD KINDER, PRINTER, GREEN ARBOUR COURT, OLD BAILEY.

CONTENTS

OF

THE THIRD VOLUME.

PART III.—(continued.)

CHAPTER VIII.

1838.
His contemplation of the probable events of the year; his debility and

helplessness ; decreasing hopes of usefulness; the truce with es-
tablished error even among inquiring men ; no chance for positive
truth except from the course of Providence; his thankfulness for
the appointments of his own life, 3-4; Suabedissen's principles
of philosophical religion, 5; his desire to control all impatience
under suffering, 5; Letter to Mrs. , 5; Letter to Professor
Powell, on his work on the Connections of Natural and Divine
Truth,-Induction, Lord Bacon's,--Aristotle's; Religion opposed
to Science, because Science opposes Idol-worship, 6–7; Suabe-
dissen ; Professor Powell, his work, his character; confusion of
thought among English writers on the connections of natural and
revealed Religion ; the want of a due preparation of mental phi-
losophy; the study of the limits and applications of the mental
faculties; both external nature and the Bible appeal to some
principle within our own minds; that principle our leading guide;
a philosophical Work wanted on the source of our knowledge re-
specting God, 8-12; Mr. S. Martin, 12; the daily increase of
his feverishness, 12; Dr. Woodward's statement, that God cannot
prevent all evil, 13; the prospect of a day, 13–14; To --,

14–15; Letter to Miss L- ; his health ; a Theological Jour-

nal; the difficulty of having a free school of theology in England;
German freedom in philosophy and theology; the worldly and
political influences affecting Religion in this country ; English
respectability, 15–16; Allgemeine Krankenhaus, 16; Dr. Suther-
land, 17; Saint Joseph's day; entertainments in Spain; contrast
between his recollections of the day and his present sufferings ;
intimation of his approaching death,Dr. Sutherland, Mr. Archer;
the Moral world seen rightly only through the mind of a virtuous

man, used as a lens; seasons of affliction bring forth these Me-

diators ; concealed generosity of Dr. and Mrs. Whately, 17-20 ;

Letter to Mrs. , 21; hypochondriacal, 21 ; Letter to Mr. -

on removing to his house, 22—3 ; Letter to the Rev. J. H. Thom,

23—4; Letter from Dr. Channing, connection between inspira-

tion and infallibleness; even under miraculous aids man conforms

to the laws of his own being; heathen notions of inspiration; the

force of the external evidence of Christianity; true faith, what it

is, 25—7; mental sympathy, 27; Letter to Mrs. - ; Portrait

of Cowper in a cap, 27-8; Letter to Dr. Channing,-his health;

the established theory of Revelation rests on a supposed necessity

in man for certainty, and fails to give it; he believes in more

Revelation than most Divines; the internal presence of God in the

Soul; Seneca ; his “ Letter on the Law of Anti-Religious Libel;"

doubts on the theory of Revelation ; God his Saviour; his testi-

mony that he dies a Christian, 28—30; Letter to Mrs. — , 30—

- 31; Letter from Professor Norton, written under the expectation

of hearing of his death, 31; to Professor Norton-his thankful-

ness for his friendship; his assurance of God's love; his freedom

from all theological fears, 31–32; his sixty-third birthday, 33 ;

Letter from Dr. Channing, written after hearing unfavourable

accounts of his health ; aspiration prophetic of a higher life; ap-

prehension lest his former letter may have excited him to injurious ·

thought in his weakened state; his desire to see Blanco White, a

chief attraction to England, 33-34 ; testaments and wills, 34 ;

the Queen's Bounty, 34; Mrs. Whately, 34; his lingering in the
face of death ; his Son, 34–35; Socrates-escape from the evils
of Old Age one of his supports in death ; Socrates as an Invalid ;
Jesus, 35–36; trust in a Future Life, 36; aspiration considered

as an argument for Immortality ; Personality; true Virtue inde-

pendent on future expectations, 36–38; Comfort as a measure of

the truth of Doctrines, 39; a human being awaiting his dissolution

with firmness, 40; Article on Bentham by Mr. John S.Mill, in the

London Review; the Constructive and the Destructive, 40–42;

Retrospect of the year, and prospect for the next, 53; reading and

music with his son, 54; his Note Book, 35; God's employment of

human language for the purposes of a Revelation, 55–56; Geo-

metrical figures, what, 56; Liverpool Unitarian Controversy; a

squib, 56-60 ; culmination of the verbal inspiration theory on

the Plan of a Lexicon of the Greek New Testament, 60–61;

his daily reading, 62; Chalybäus on German Philosophy from

Kant to Hegel, 62–63; projected works against religious errors,

64; his son leaves him for India, 64; Letter to J--, his son ;

a new translation of Don Quixote; a Life of Cervantes, 65;

beliefs and priesthoods, 66; Letter to Dr. Channing,—his health,

Slavery, War, its redeeming features, its abolition, 66–68; a

projected tale, The Secret Diary of a Spanish Inquisitor, 69; his

sixty-fourth birthday; Keightley's Mythology; the unchangeable

character of ecclesiastical persecution 70–71; his son; Michelet's

History of France, the Swan,-Redesdale, 71–72; Hallam's

opinion of the copiousness and variety of the English Lan-

guage; its motleyness; Latinisms; its poverty shown by the

difficulty of translating from the German ; its want of internal

organization would facilitate the admission of new words, except

for an extreme fastidiousness; mental philosophy requires a tech-

nical language; Abstract words wanted in English; the formation

of them from adjectives ; subsume, 72–74; the want of a proper

nomenclature one of the difficulties of mental philosophy in En--

gland; the German nomenclature; the schoolmen, 74-76 ;

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